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In order to make an electrically neutral object

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In order to make an electrically neutral object charged, you either need to add electrons or remove them. If I rub this plastic pipe with a piece of fur, I rub electrons off of with the fur and they transfer to the pipe.
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Charging (1) “Electric Slide” (Source: Ken Bosma) http://www.flickr.com/photos/evdg/304764153/
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Charging (2) “Fuel Pump Fire” (Source: drunkenpuppies) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUf8vc7I6bc
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Charging “Fuel Pump Fire” (Source: drunkenpuppies) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUf8vc7I6bc Discharging
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Charging “Galunggung, Indonesia” (Source: R. Hadian, U.S. Geological Survey) http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/img/200_res/30/30_603.tif Discharging
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Induction In addition to adding or removing electrons, you can rearrange the electrons present in the object. For example, when you place a positively charged object next to a neutral object, the protons will be repulsed and the electrons will be attracted. This will lead to an overall attraction for the neutral object to the positively charged object.
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Polarization “Cooper and Styrofoam” (Source: Sean McGrath) http://www.flickr.com/photos/mcgraths/235112299/
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Conductors Conductors are objects in which charges (electrons) can move freely through. Examples of conductors are aluminum, tungsten, platinum, and most other metals. If you put a charge on a small region of a conductor, the charge will distribute itself over the entire surface of the material.
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Conductor + + + + + + + +
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+ + + + + + + + Conductor & (+) + + + + + + + + + (net attraction)
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