Provide regular feedback to help the group to stay

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Provide regular feedback to help the group to stay focused on goals. Groups with a low level of communication have less trust and cooperation. To increase cooperation and trust: 1) Practice effective communication during group meetings; 2) Simplify complex information; 3) Ensure all group members have a voice and understand the topics presented. Encourage group members to pay attention to one another. Discuss one topic at a time. Work through group conflicts rather than avoiding them. Ensure that all group members have an opportunity to state their views. Clearly state decisions so that all members understand. Active Listening Applause is the only appreciated interruption. Arnold Glasgow Active listening is a multistep process of mindfully hearing and attempting to comprehend the meaning of words spoken by another person in a conversation or speech (McNaughton, Hamlin, McCarthy, Head-Reeves, and Schreiner 2008). In group settings, the goal has been to develop a clear understanding of the speaker’s concern and also to clearly communicate the listener’s interest in the speaker’s message. When all members of a group practice effective active listening, communication can be improved, this builds trust and cooperation. The following techniques have helped develop good active listening skills:
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109 Acknowledging what you're hearing Example: "I see . . . Hmmm" (nodding). Asking for more information Example: "That sounds interesting. Tell us more." Paraphrasing Example: "So, do I hear you saying that although the plans aren't finished, we should start marketing the workshop while the committee works on the details?" Sharing Information Example: "I have some names of people in my office that could help us with this problem. I will send those to you before we make the final decision." Checking feelings Example: "It seems like you're frustrated. Tell us what concerns you about this situation." Reporting feelings Example: "It's been a long day. I'm not productive anymore. I'd like to think about this and get back together on Wednesday." Offering or requesting more options Example: "We've listed some good ideas. Can we expand any of those ideas now?" Body Language Body language has been defined as communication without words. Body language includes “overt behaviors such as facial expressions, eye contact, touching and tone of voice. Group members’ body language helps communicate their interest, boredom or confusion, as well as whether they are in agreement or disagreement with other members. When verbal and nonverbal messages are in alignment the most effective group communication and synergy tends to occur. Care should be taken so that group members do not come to false conclusions. Observe nonverbal communication and then use it as a “check point” to confirm what group members have communicated. Check information with a question, such as: Example: "I’m having a tough time guaging yo ur reaction to the news. How are people feeling about this proposal right now?" Or, "I see some frowns. Would someone like to share a concern?" 9.3.4. FACTORS INFLUENCING GROUP COMMUNICATION
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