Ask the students if they were surprised to learn about the involvement of

Ask the students if they were surprised to learn

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each individual. Ask the students if they were surprised to learn about the involvement of family or friends in STEM fields, inviting those who volunteer to elaborate on their reaction, particularly to women.2.Ask several students to explain whether it is important to be able to tell stories that acknowledge the role of women in history and STEM fields, and if so, why.3.Next, explain to the students that they will have the opportunity to learn more about women in STEM fields—and celebrate them—by researching a woman of their choice. Distribute copies of Handout 3: Breaking the Stereotype—Poster Project for Visualizing Women in STEMto each student and explain that they will be making a poster that honors the discipline, type of work, and achievements of the woman, as well as her contributions to the STEM field in which she works or worked.4.Review the instructions and requirements for the project with the students using the handout, noting that they should work independently and will be responsible for determining which notable STEM women they would like to research. Remind them that the STEM women chosen for this project can be past or present. Establish and announce due dates for student topic decisions, reference acquisition, and final project submission based on your available timeframe. You may use class time for research, have students work on their own, or combine approaches. 5.Allow students time to begin searching online for the STEM woman on which their project will focus. Research topics should be limited to one woman per student; encourage a wide variety of final projects. 6.When the posters are completed, hang them in your “gallery” and hold a kick-off event. (See Notes to the Teacher.) At the opening, invite the students to explain ways in which they are inspired by the work of the women highlighted in their projects with those in attendance. Their presentations should be informal and conversational, with a unique focus on the contributions of the individuals to the greater scientific community and a celebration of women in STEM fields. (Note: Leave the posters in place at the conclusion of the display for use in the next part of this lesson.)7.To prepare for the next part of this lesson, distribute Handout 4: Do Girls See Themselves As Smart?andask the students to complete it for homework. Encourage them to bring a printed or digital copy of the article to the next class; provide copies for anyone without computer access.Part 3: Inspiring the Next Generation1.Host a class discussion using the questions from Handout 4: Do Girls See Themselves As Smart?that students were asked to complete for homework.2.Ask students to define the term “inspiration.” Ask them to consider someone they know who was inspired to try something new, pursue a passion, or launch a career at some point in their lives; call on several students to discuss who this person is or was and what inspired the person.
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