Summary This article makes the argument that the rise of physically active

Summary this article makes the argument that the rise

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Summary This article makes the argument that the rise of physically-active video games (or exergames as the article calls them) has caused a collective interest as to whether they can be helpful as to finding new ways to improve the cognitive functions of the people who seem to play them. The researchers talk about how these tests were done in order to establish the effects of exergames on overall cognitive functions and some of the specific cognitive functions in the brain. The test was done using both older adults and clinical populations with conditions associated with neurocognitive impairments to better test the effects of these games. At the end of their research, the researchers talk about the influence efficacy of exergames, and explore neurobiological mechanisms of action and how they have changed over the course of the gaming times the subjects were experienced with and how much their reflexes have changed. Evaluation
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This source is a review article posted to the ScienceDirect website on April 23, 2017 by Emma Stanmore, Brendon Stubbs, Davy Vancampfort, Eling D. deBruin, and Joseph Firth. This is a reliable source because it is posted on a well respected website and gives multiple reference points in the article so people can fact check their results. The exigence of the article is that exergames can give benefits to cognitive functions in people who are both healthy and especially those who are disabled. The audience of the article is most likely people who suffer or know someone who suffers from a disability in the brain because the article repeats certain points about the benefits these games have on the people who deal with disabilities. Reflection This source is important to my research because it gives a study into the benefits of active video games on those who have disabilities and how they can help them develop a cognitive function along with those who do not have such disabilities. I learned that these types of games can have some very beneficial effects on both healthy and disabled people with positive effects on both sides. This will shape my argument because since this will bring up disabled people, the argument will have to be formated in order to prevent it from being offensive towards those who do have these disabilities. Considering all of the negative reception that video games tend to receive, can it be possible that videogames have positive effects on people and/or children, even though so much evidence suggests otherwise?
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