ANAs restrictive 1955 definition of nursing reinforced the practice of nursing

Anas restrictive 1955 definition of nursing

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ANA's restrictive 1955 definition of nursing reinforced the practice of nursing as having independent functions and being dependent on and delegated to by the profession of medicine. It also prohibited nurses from diagnosing and prescribing. By definition, the term scope of practice describes practice limits and sets the parameters within which nurses in the various advanced practice nursing specialties may legally practice . Scope statements define what APRNs can do for and with patients, what they can delegate, and when collaboration with others is required. Scope of practice statements tell APRNs what is actually beyond the limits of their nursing practice (American Nurses Association [ANA], 2003, 2012; Buppert, 2012; Kleinpell, Hudspeth, Scordo, et al., 2012). The scope of practice for each of the four APRN roles differs (see Part III). Scope of practice statements are key to the debate about how the U.S. health care system uses APRNs as health care providers; scope is inextricably linked with barriers to advanced practice nursing. CRNAs, who administer general anesthesia, have a scope of practice markedly different from that of the primary care nurse practitioner (NP), for example, although both have their roots in basic nursing. In addition, it is important to understand that scope of practice differs among states and is based on state laws promulgated by the various state nurse practice acts and rules and regulations for APRNs (Lugo, O'Grady, Hodnicki, et al., 2007, 2009; NCSBN, 2012; Pearson, 2012). On the Internet, scope of practice statements can be found by searching state government websites in the areas of licensing boards, nursing, and advanced practice nursing rules and regulations, or by visiting the NCSBN site (). Recent federal policy initiatives, 4
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including the IOM Future of Nursing Report, (2011). the PPACA (HHS, 2011), and the Josiah Macy Foundation (Cronenwett & Dzau, 2010) have all issued recom mendations with important implications for expanding the scope of practice for APRNs. The National Health Policy Forum () and Citizen Advocacy Center () reports state firmly that current scope of practice adjudication is far too technical, subject to political pressure, and therefore not appropriate in the legislative sphere. There must be a more powerful forum so that the public can enter into the dialogue (see Chapter 22). As scope of practice expands, accountability becomes a crucial factor as APRNs obtain more authority over their own practices. First, it is important that scope of practice statements identify the legal parameters of each APRN role. Furthermore, it is crucial that scope of practice statements presented by national certifying entities are carried through in language in state statutes (Buppert, 2012). Our society is highly mobile and APRNs must recognize that their scope of practice will vary among states; in a worst case scenario, one can be an
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