A delay resulting from congestion at one node in the air transportation system

A delay resulting from congestion at one node in the

This preview shows page 72 - 73 out of 84 pages.

in an airport in a particular state for a plane that has been delayed on its previous leg due to congestion at an airport in another state. A  delay resulting from congestion at one node in the air transportation system often results in further delays for connecting passengers  throughout the entire system. Thus, spending increases at airports that are proverbially riddled with time delays confer spillover  benefits on individuals in other states who travel through the airport in question. These benefits are in the form of travel time savings.  This could make it socially optimal for an individual state to increase its airport spending when other states spend more on airports.  Moreover, these benefits are reciprocal in nature as described by Oates (1972). It will be important to incorporate this potential  interdependency into an empirical framework that examines asymmetric state and local airport expenditure responses to changes in  AIP grants.   Federal funding key – states fail, oversight Bennett 99 (Grant D., “ Funding Airport Infrastructure: Federal Options for Solvency”,  Journal of Engineering and Public Policy, August 5 th , 1999, - intern.org/journal/1999/index.html)//IIN The FAA, through the Airport Improvement Program (AIP), addresses infrastructure  needs. The AIP was established to promote and enhance safety, security, capacity, noise  mitigation and environmental concerns, and to promote the use of existing infrastructure   (i.e., using former military airports for civilian use).22 In general, the AIP receives money from the Aviation Trust Fund to address  infrastructure and development needs and concerns at airports.  Although the AIP is tasked to support  airport infrastructure, the demand for further funding is not met by these federal  dollars and the burden is falling on state and regional authorities.  The overall capital  development by airports in 1998 is shown in the chart below.23 Funding Sources for Capital Development Airport Revenue 2% Tax  Exempt Bonds 58% Regional Gov't 4% Passenger Facility Charges 16% AIP Grants 20% The tax-exempt bonds are issued at the  regional level, leaving AIP grants as the sole source for federal funding. Even  for AIP projects, the nonfederal  share of funding is 10% for smaller airports and 25% for large and medium hub  airports. 24 Passenger Facility Charges Although the federal government does not fund a majority of infrastructure,  the AIP  grants and Passenger Facility Charges  (PFC’s)  combined cover over one-third of the  development money, and could be increased to cover a larger share.
Image of page 72
Image of page 73

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 84 pages?

  • Fall '13
  • Person
  • Sula, United¬†States., Airport Improvement Program

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes