Kat o kyle higgins kyle higgins thursdaylocal jan 24

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Kat o Kyle Higgins Kyle Higgins ThursdayLocal: Jan 24 at 9:23pm<br>Course: Jan 24 at 8:23pm Manage Discussion Entry I agree with the other classmates that the slippery slope method is being used, whether intentionally or just from the fact that she thinks she is right. Dr. Phil further identifies the logical fallacy by asking questions about her experience and credentials, while she stated "no" on every single question asked. Then, she attempts to assume that this stuff heals all kinds of ailments, regrows limbs, and cures cancer. Nonsense.
o Earl Smoak Jr Earl Smoak Jr FridayLocal: Jan 25 at 9:31am<br>Course: Jan 25 at 8:31am Manage Discussion Entry What types of fallacies is she using? In my opinion, I think this is more of the Appeal to Ignorance (argumentum ad ignorantiam) Any time ignorance is used as a major premise in support of an argument, it’s liable to be a fallacious appeal to ignorance. She has no proof, no background and everything she found came from the internet as well she not thinking about the long term Fallacy of Sunk Costs Sometimes we invest ourselves so thoroughly in a project that we’re reluctant to ever abandon it, even when it turns out to be fruitless and futile. o Chris Styer Chris Styer SaturdayLocal: Jan 26 at 11:48am<br>Course: Jan 26 at 10:48am Manage Discussion Entry I think that she used slippery slope and hasty generalizations. The slippery slope method was used when she was referring to a cut healing itself and comparing it to growing back a limb. These are two completely different things and should not be compared in the same category. One thing does not lead to another in this situation and she was trying to convince the audience otherwise. She used hasty generalizations because she admitted she had no medical background. She has done no clinical trials, no medical license, no background in the subject at all. Yet, somehow she has all the answers because of the internet. o Julia Divino
Julia Divino SaturdayLocal: Jan 26 at 8:10pm<br>Course: Jan 26 at 7:10pm Manage Discussion Entry Professor and class, I believe that she is using a slippery slope fallacy but I also believe she may be using hasty generalizations. When she is stating that since when we get a cut on our arm it is cells regrowing, then that is regeneration and yes we could regrow limbs. o Collapse Subdiscussion Marcus Roof Marcus Roof SaturdayLocal: Jan 26 at 9:12pm<br>Course: Jan 26 at 8:12pm Manage Discussion Entry I would say that the "Red Herring" fallacy is definitely used here to divert attention away from the real questions being asked. When they asked how the product was going to grow an arm, she diverts attention by stating that if you can heal a cut then you can grow an arm. Unbelievable, the statements made and with no factual or scientific merits to back up the claims. Collapse Subdiscussion Katherine Seikkula Katherine Seikkula SaturdayLocal: Jan 26 at 11:12pm<br>Course: Jan 26 at 10:12pm Manage Discussion Entry I agree Marcus. Red Herring is also a fallacy she used. Trying to induce the audience to believe false conclusions. Because her statements were so obviously unsupported an not factual I am not surprised she would use this argument.

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