As it were upon the wind to the eager gaze of him who

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as it were upon the wind, to the eager gaze of him, who forgot the letters he had just decypheredupon an almost effaced tablet, in the contemplation of her sylph-like figure. Often would hertresses falling, as she flitted around, exhibit in the sun's ray such delicately brilliant and swiftlyfading hues, its might well excuse the forgetfulness of the antiquary, who let escape from hismind the very object he had before thought of vital importance to the proper interpretation of apassage in Pausanias. But why attempt to describe charms which all feel, but none canappreciate?—It was innocence, youth, and beauty, unaffected by crowded drawing-rooms andstifling balls. Whilst he drew those remains of which he wished to preserve a memorial for hisfuture hours, she would stand by, and watch the magic effects of his pencil, in tracing the scenesof her native place; she would then describe to him the circling dance upon the open plain, wouldpaint, to him in all the glowing colours of youthful memory, the marriage pomp she rememberedviewing in her infancy; and then, turning to subjects that had evidently made a greaterimpression upon her mind, would tell him all the supernatural tales of her nurse. Her earnestnessand apparent belief of what she narrated, excited the interest even of Aubrey; and often as shetold him the tale of the living vampyre, who had passed years amidst his friends, and dearest ties,forced every year, by feeding upon the life of a lovely female to prolong his existence for theensuing months, his blood would run cold, whilst he attempted to laugh her out of such idle andhorrible fantasies; but Ianthe cited to him the names of old men, who had at last detected oneliving among themselves, after several of their near relatives and children had been foundmarked with the stamp of the fiend's appetite; and when she found him so incredulous, shebegged of him to believe her, for it had been, remarked, that those who had dared to questiontheir existence, always had some proof given, which obliged them, with grief and heartbreaking,to confess it was true. She detailed to him the traditional appearance of these monsters, and hishorror was increased, by hearing a pretty accurate description of Lord Ruthven; he, however, stillpersisted in persuading her, that there could be no truth in her fears, though at the same time he
13wondered at the many coincidences which had all tended to excite a belief in the supernaturalpower of Lord Ruthven.Aubrey began to attach himself more and more to Ianthe; her innocence, so contrasted withall the affected virtues of the women among whom he had sought for his vision of romance, wonhis heart; and while he ridiculed the idea of a young man of English habits, marrying anuneducated Greek girl, still he found himself more and more attached to the almost fairy formbefore him. He would tear himself at times from her, and, forming a plan for some antiquarianresearch, he would depart, determined not to return until his object was attained; but he always

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