Negotiators are often uncertain about each others

Info icon This preview shows pages 25–26. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
profits are likely to be. Negotiators are often uncertain about each other's interests, I radeoffs, attitudes toward risk and time, forecasts, technology, and so on. Misleading each other can become a significant element in the separate quests to claim value. TypicaJly, interests are overstated with Illc intention of later "conceding" for a good price. Understatement lo disguise actualvaluation can prevent being squeezed. The lure of Illese tactics is individual gain; the victims are often foregone joint \alue-and ethical standards. rhe Language of Claiming \Ilhough the object of tactical action may be an opponent's percep- I ion of the bargaining set, the language by which value is claimedof- I L'Il has a moral ringo In many negotiations, positions are advanced ,\lId justified not by arguing that the negotiator desires them but \ ;11 her that they are "right," morally, socially, or scientifically.21 Dis- I ributive negotiations over who will get more are often carried out by .\ proxy discussion over who is more morally or factually correct. To ;\rgue for advantageous outcomes, negotiators draw on norms of jus- I icc and equity, institutional rules, consistency with past promises ;\lId performance, and appropriate social behavior. Sometimes, the force fui assertion of a norm is sufficient to gain ;\,l',rcement: "It is only right that I pay you what the others are get- I illg, not more." Even when one do es not place intrinsic value on act- "\g in accord with a certain norm, one may bear social costs for re- Il'L'I ing it outright. 22 For example, in response to an appeal to a \\iddy accepted standard of fairness in dividing benefits, one may ar- .!'lIC that the proposed rule is not applicable and propose another, \"ore favorable one. By contrast, the response that "1 do not want to ~ISee Gulliver (1979) for a clear discussion of the use of norms in negotiation. I "her and Ury's (1981) approach to negotiation relies heavily on the prevalence and ·1 kc'l iveness of normative argumento Condlin (1985) provides an interesting discus- .1' >11 uf argumentation in negotiation. "See Gulliver (1979: 192). I 1I ir I! 11 I '1 II[ 1",1.1 '1 !!
Image of page 25

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
142 Negotiation Analysis be fair, 1 want the biggest slice of the pie," can be costIy. Thus, a ne- gotiator is more likely to acknowledge the norm but argue that it is inappropriate to the situation at hand or that it has been applied in- correctIy. Applied correctly, with the real facts about the real situa- tion, the outcome would be quite different (and advantageous to the opponent). "Yes, fifty-fifty would be the right way to go, but 1 put in more work and am more senior." Pressures to do the "right" thing can be applied not merely to the outcome but to behavior during the negotiation as well. For example, consider a restaurant chain owner who sought to expand her business in two new regions (the South and Southwest). She hoped to share the returns from the South with an early investor but retain for herself the profits from the more promising Southwest. The investor argued that because he invested early in the life of the chain, he deserved the same treatment from all of the chain's ventures. Accepting the
Image of page 26
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern