Collapse mark as read re before the board meeting

This preview shows page 122 - 124 out of 223 pages.

Collapse Mark as Read RE: BEFORE THE BOARD MEETING: Stephenie Gordon Email this Author 9/26/2014 10:55:45 PM Modified:9/26/2014 11:00 PM I can think of several employees that fit into this category. Most of them work as certified nursing assistants in the hospital. They work full time hours but didn’t pursue a higher education to make more money. Many of them have three to four kids that they have to care for, with and without spouses. There is this one employee that comes to mind as we discuss this. She works as a CNA full time, married with one child. Her husband works full time also making 9.00 Hr and she make 7.00 an hour. She has confided in me multiple times, stating that with their two incomes they can barely manage their bills. I can definitely understand this, because prior to nursing school I worked as a secretary making 7.15 and hr. Then I hired as a CNA making 7.45 an hour. After 4 years I graduated from school as a LPN making 14.35 hr. Even though this increase helped my family tremendously, it wasn’t until I went to school and graduated as a registered nurse before I would have some extra funs left over to buy myself a dress. Collapse Mark as Read Board Meeting David Smeed Email this Author 9/21/2014 3:14:57 PM This is a valuable argument and discussion to have. I absolutely would build this. As the leader of the team, it is important to immediately eliminate any obvious bias and opinions that pose no true merit to this discussion. For example, Henrys comment about homeless people being “lazy” is just biased opinion. To counter his argument, the inhabitants of this future homeless shelter will be referred to as the working poor, indicating that it isn’t because of laziness they are poor. Kelly’s argument surrounds the idea that it is the homeless peoples fault due to their “lack of foresight and responsibility”. This goes hand-in-hand with Henrys belief that the majority of these homeless individuals didn’t receive a high-school diploma and thus is their fault. To address this issue, it is important to understand the environment in which many of these individuals grew up. Children who grow up in low-SES neighborhoods are already at a disadvantage than those of higher SES. For example, “Students from low-SES schools entered high school 3.3 grade levels behind students from higher SES schools. In addition, students from the low-SES groups learned less over 4 years than children from higher SES groups, graduating 4.3 grade levels behind those of higher SES groups”
(American Psychological Association, 2014, p. 1). Such fundamental inequality substantial decreases the odds of finishing school “anchored in illiteracy, lack of self-efficacy, hopelessness, despair, and criminalization” all too common in such neighborhoods (Oladele & Williams, 2008, p. 1). Therefore, it is not by pure laziness that these individuals are homeless; it is based on a society tilted away from success and toward a life of continued poverty. Larry brings up a valuable point of the shelter

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture