He issued what is now famously known as the Gracie Challenge As he explained I

He issued what is now famously known as the gracie

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 12 pages.

Carlos concocted a brilliant marketing scheme to draw attention to the fledgling academy. He  issued what is now famously known as the “Gracie Challenge.” As he explained, “I had to do  something to shock the people.” He began the “Gracie Challenge” by taking out an advertisement  in several Rio newspapers. The advertisement, which included a picture of the slight Carlos  Gracie, information on the academy, and stated “If you want a broken arm, or rib, contact Carlos  Gracie at this number.” This effectively began the revival of professional mixed martial arts in the  Western world, as Carlos, and later his younger brother Helio, followed by the sons of both men,  would take on all comers in vale-tudo matches. These matches closely resembled the pankration  matches of Ancient Greece, and were participated in by representatives of area karate schools,  professional boxers, capoeira champions, and various others that sought to prove that they were  better than the Gracies.  As word of these matches spread through Rio de Janeiro, the public craved these matches. As a  result, these matches began to be held in Brazil’s large soccer stadiums, and attracted record  crowds. The first of these professional fights was between Brazilian Lightweight Boxing  Champion, Antonio Portugal and Carlos’ younger, smaller, and much frailer brother Helio. Helio  won the match in less than 30 seconds, effectively elevating himself to the status of Brazilian 
Image of page 5
hero. At the time, Brazil had no international sports heroes, and Helio filled that void for the  Brazilians. As word of these matches spread to Japan, the great martial arts champions of Japan sought to  participate in this new form of competition against the Gracies, who the Japanese thought were  defiling their traditional arts. Japanese champions flocked to Rio de Janeiro to do battle with Helio  Gracie, who was always out weighed by his opponents, often by more than 100 pounds. He  defeated many great Japanese fighters, and in a trip to the United States, Helio defeated the  World Freestyle Wrestling Champion, American super heavyweight Fred Ebert. One-hundred- thirty-five pound Helio continued to defend the Gracie name and their martial art, often against  opponents weighing as much as 300 pounds, from 1935 until 1951, fighting over 1000 fights, until  Carlos’ son, Carlson, and later Helio’s sons Rolls, Rickson and Rorion took over the roll of family  champion in upholding the “Gracie Challenge.”  The new combat sport of vale-tudo fighting became immensely popular, quickly rising to become  the second most popular sport, in terms of ticket sales, in Brazil behind soccer. This is a status 
Image of page 6
Image of page 7

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 12 pages?

  • Spring '08
  • Vidirine
  • Mixed martial arts, UFC, Ultimate Fighting Championship

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes