Reading 802 Fall 11 Kindred essay

This would also mean that there would be equality

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white characters. This would also mean that there would be equality amongst the enslaved blacks and the whites that owned them. This would also mean that in reality, actual historical accounts such as Plenty Coups travels to Washington , in which Coups travels with other tribal chiefs to unsuccessfully negotiate the halting of building a railroad on the lands of his tribe and many others were successful ( Plenty Coups; Cultural Conversations). Realistically speaking, it is as if one was to say that there was no hardship for the Native American people who were pushed out of their homelands towards the western part of America despite the pleas and petitions that are spoken of in Albert Yava’s We Want To Tell You Something (Yava; Cultural Conversations). And if that was the case, how could slavery possibly exist for the black characters in the story? This is not to say that Kindred has to thrive off of the oppression of racism. It does however state that, the story does not have much of a chance in surviving with out it. “Even science fiction which does not explicitly delve into the racial issues may still respond to them ( Thomas; Leonard 254).” Kindred itself succeeds as a critical genre because of its power to educate and inform through
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doing more than just shooting out facts of slavery, patriarchal power, racial oppression and resistance in the early 19 th century to the reading audience. It incorporates all of the factual evidence and mixes it together with the help of fictional story telling and science fiction to help give the reader much more than just one-sided knowledge . It helps to educate the reader and show them through experiencing through first person’s narrative just what it was like to be there with the main characters and all of the supporting characters. Through educating and informing the reading audience it succeeds to give the reader an unbiased account of how the people of the world before them lived and dealt with the issues of their time. Tonia, this is a good start. but you need to do more than just summarize the book. Right now that’s about all you do. And you only tack on all the other sources you use as an afterthought to your summarizing. analyze everything you discuss and relate it to the other texts you cite. keep it up. sam
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Works Cited Butler, Octavia E. Kindred . Boston: Beacon, 2003. Print. Mendlesohn, Farah. "Introduction to Reading Science Fiction." Cambridge Companions Online :Cambridge University Press (2006): 1-3. Web. Leonard, Elisabeth Anne, Thomas, Sheree R. "Race and Ethnicity in Science Fiction." Cambridge Companions Online :Cambridge University Press (2006): 254. Web. Coups, Plenty. " Plenty Coups Travels To Washington." Cultural Conversations: the Presence of the past . By Stephen Dilks, Regina Hansen, and Matthew Parfitt. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2001. 564. Print. Yava, Albert. " We Want To Tell You Something." Cultural Conversations: the Presence of the past . By Stephen Dilks, Regina Hansen, and Matthew Parfitt. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2001. 564-69. Print.
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This would also mean that there would be equality amongst...

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