Whether this failure to report the correct hESC origin was deliberate or

Whether this failure to report the correct hesc

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Whether this failure to report the correct hESC origin was deliberate or accidental is unclear. But it would have been a "seminal finding if they hadn't had their blinders on”!CellNEWS: California Company Creates Parthenogenetic hESC Lines Dec 20, 2007 …CellNEWS: Chinese Groups Make Parthenogenetic hESCs Dec 13, 2007 ...
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Lecture 13 Case Study [17]: Woo Suk Hwang And on March 13, 2012 another new twist! Mammoth remains were uncovered in thawed Siberian permafrost, and scientists around the world have been trying to extract DNA from the remains. A new project involving Russians and S. Koreans, including Hwang of South Korea's Sooam Biotech Research Foundation The plan would work like previous cloning studies that successfully reproduced dogs, a cow, a cat, a pig, a wolf and coyotes. The nuclei of mammoth somatic cells would be implanted into the nuclei of donor Indian elephant eggs using SCNT, to produce elephant embryos with mammoth DNA. The embryos would then be implanted in elephant wombs, where they would gestate for 22 months.
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Lecture 13 Stem Cell Breakthroughs [18]: Primates On November 14, 2007 it was announced that the skin cell of a monkey called Semos- the name of the god in the popular sci-fi movie Planet of the Apes- was inserted into a primate egg via SCNT to create for the first time cloned primate embryos to make embryonic stem-cell lines. The accomplishment in primates is "like breaking the sound barrier", says Robert Lanza, with Advanced Cell Technology in Los Angeles, California. It turns out that use of SCNT in primates was far more difficult than originally believed after the successful cloning of Dolly.
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Lecture 13 Stem Cell Breakthrough [18]: Primates The team from the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland had been trying for nearly a decade to achieve reproductive cloning in primates, and had used some 15,000 eggs in the process. The group decided to move from reproductive cloning to try to establish a cloned embryonic stem-cell line instead — theoretically, a more achievable goal. In 2006, the researchers had a false start when a cloned monkey embryo, produced what seemed to be viable embryonic stem cells. But after a week, the cells started to differentiate uncontrollably, losing their nature as totipotent embryonic stem cells. But by January 2007, they had another line that retained its embryonic stem-cell properties, and a couple of months later, they had created yet another.
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Lecture 13 Stem Cell Breakthrough [18]: Primates The Oregon team credits their use of a machine called Oosight (polarized light microscope), which allows them to see the structures in the egg that carry DNA - thereby easing its extraction – the first step in SCNT. Conventionally, researchers have used a dye and ultraviolet light to locate and remove an egg's DNA. But Mitalipov's group found that both the light and the dye damaged the egg.
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