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HC 260 Week 7 Final Exam study guide

Some common problems with the informed consent

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Some common problems with the Informed Consent Document include the use of jargon, technical, or scientific terms that a lay person would not understand, and units of measure given in metric rather than the lay equivalents. Ordinary language should replace technical terms (e.g., upper extremities are better referred to as arms, hematoma as a bruise, venipuncture as taking blood from your arm with a needle, and so forth. But perhaps the most common problem with Informed Consent Documents is that they are written at a reading level several grades higher than the average subject would understand. Informed Consent Documents should be written at a reading level that potential subjects would understand. For most projects, an eighth grade reading level is suggested. Most word processing programs can determine a document's reading level. the capacity of the human subject to participate in this process of informed decision making is a critical component, though not the total corpus, of the present system of public oversight of biomedical and behavioral research. Under a strict "protection model" those who lack the capacity to give informed consent, or whose capacity to do so is uncertain, may be excluded from participation as research subjects. The first step in the clinical assessment of mental capacity is to determine the type of mental capacity to be assessed by interviewing the individual, agency, health care professional, or legal representative requesting the assessment. The type of mental capacity to be assessed determines the kinds of questions asked during the specific assessment of mental capacity. There are as many potential types of mental capacity as there are potential issues about which older adults must have knowledge and make decisions, since capacity or lack of capacity is determined on an issue-by-issue basis. Some of the more commonly-assessed types of mental capacity include: capacity to consent to medical treatment, capacity to refuse medical treatment, capacity to manage finances, capacity to determine living circumstances, and capacity to make a will 12. What are DNR orders and advance directives? " do not resuscitate " or " DNR ", sometimes called a " No Code ", is a legal order written either in the hospital or on a legal form to respect the wishes of a patient not to undergo CPR or advanced cardiac life support ( ACLS ) if their heart were to stop or they were to stop breathing . The term "code" is commonly used by medical professionals as a slang term for "calling in a Code Blue " to alert a hospital's resuscitation team. The DNR request is usually made by the patient or health care power of attorney and allows the medical teams taking care of them to respect their wishes. Advance directives are legal documents that allow you to convey your decisions about end-of-life care ahead of time. They provide a way for you to communicate your wishes to family, friends and health care professionals, and to avoid confusion later on.
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