Moreover the power to impose taxes and other levies the power to appropriate

Moreover the power to impose taxes and other levies

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Moreover, the power to impose taxes and other levies, the power to appropriate money, and the power to pass ordinances or resolutions with penal sanctions were vested exclusively in the MMC . Thus, Metropolitan Manila had a “central government,” i.e., the MMC which fully possessed legislative and police powers. Whatever legislative powers the component cities and municipalities had were all subject to review and approval by the MMC . After President Corazon Aquino assumed power, there was a clamor to restore the autonomy of the local government units in Metro Manila. Hence, Sections 1 and 2 of Article X of the 1987 Constitution x x x. The Constitution, however, recognized the necessity of creating 149
metropolitan regions not only in the existing National Capital Region but also in potential equivalents in the Visayas and Mindanao . X x x The Constitution itself expressly provides that Congress may, by law, create “special metropolitan political subdivisions” which shall be subject to approval by a majority of the votes cast in a plebiscite in the political units directly affected; the jurisdiction of this subdivision shall be limited to basic services requiring coordination; and the cities and municipalities comprising this subdivision shall retain their basic autonomy and their own local executive and legislative assemblies (Section 11, Article X, 1987 Constitution). Pending enactment of this law, the Transitory Provisions of the Constitution gave the President of the Philippines the power to constitute the Metropolitan Authority x x x. In 1990, President Aquino issued Executive Order No. 392 and constituted the Metropolitan Manila Authority (MMA). The powers and functions of the MMC were devolved to the MMA. It ought to be stressed, however, that not all powers and functions of the MMC were passed to the MMA. The MMA’s power was limited to the “delivery of basic urban services requiring coordination in Metropolitan Manila.” The MMA’s governing body, the Metropolitan Manila Council, although composed of the mayors of the component cities and municipalities, was merely given the power of : (1) formulation of policies on the delivery of basic services requiring coordination and consolidation ; and (2) promulgation of resolutions and other issuances, approval of a code of basic services and the exercise of its rule-making power .” Under the 1987 Constitution, the local government units became primarily responsible for the governance of their respective political subdivisions. The MMA’s jurisdiction was limited to addressing common problems involving basic services that transcended local boundaries. It did not have legislative power. Its power was merely to provide the local government units technical assistance in the preparation of local development plans. Any semblance of legislative power it had was confined to a “review [of] legislation proposed by the local legislative assemblies to ensure consistency among local governments and with the

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