Test Taking Strategy Draw on your knowledge of therapeutic communication

Test taking strategy draw on your knowledge of

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Test-Taking Strategy: Draw on your knowledge of therapeutic communication techniques to answer this question. First eliminate the option containing the word “why.” To select from the remaining options, focus on the information in the question. The correct option provides the client the opportunity to verbalize feelings. Review therapeutic communication techniques if you had difficulty with this question. References: Stuart, G. (2009). Principles & practice of psychiatric nursing (9th ed., pp. 27-31). St. Louis: Mosby. Varcarolis, E., & Halter, M. (2009). Essentials of psychiatric mental health nursing: A communication approach to evidence-based care (pp. 38, 39). St. Louis: Saunders. Cognitive Ability: Applying Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity Integrated Process: Communication and Documentation
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Content Area: Mental Health Awarded 1.0 points out of 1.0 possible points. 17.ID: 283623472 The wife of a dying man is ignoring his rapid physiological decline and imminent death. She continues with her usual activities, exhibits inability to remember what others have just told her, and misses important appointments. Which therapeutic statement should the nurse make to the wife? “It isn’t unusual for family to suffer from anticipatory grief when a loved one is dying.” Correct “I cannot emphasize how much your husband needs you to be there for him right now. He is in the stage of denial.” “You will need to concentrate on getting to these appointments on time and write down what everyone says so you will remember.” “Can you talk about what’s happening to you right now? Your behavior is not appropriate at this stage of your husband’s illness. You seem to be having sympathy pains for him, like men during their wives’ pregnancies.” Rationale: Anticipatory grief is premourning with specific clinical manifestations. The signs of anticipatory grief include feeling empty and lost, fatigued, and numb. Other behaviors include unreality and disbelief, periods of weeping or rage, a desire to run away from the situation, micromanagement of the client’s care, anger at the caregivers and the dying client, pronounced dependency, and fear. By describing this syndrome as common, the nurse offers understanding and assists the spouse in becoming more aware of her feelings and behaviors. This will free her from guilt and enhance her ability to deal with the situation. In stating, “I cannot emphasize how much your husband needs you to be there for him right now. He is in the stage of denial,” or “You will need to concentrate on making these appointments on time and write down what everyone says so you will remember,” the nurse expresses disapproval of the spouse’s behavior, a nontherapeutic response that will probably cause the client to feel guilty. In stating, “Can you talk about what’s happening to you right now? Your behavior is not appropriate at this stage of your husband’s illness. You seem to be having sympathy pains for him, like
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