Bad Examples Gamification does not always work especially if the game does not

Bad examples gamification does not always work

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Bad Examples: Gamification does not always work especially if the game does not fit with the company’s overall strategy and disconnects with the brand. 1) The Marriott Hotel used Gamification on Facebook to attract new hires. Marriott developed a hotel-themed online game where players have to juggle all sorts of responsibilities that hotel managers would have. One of the problems with this game strategy is that it was advertised on Marriotts Facebook page, which is a social media channel that should be used to engage with customers not potential new hires. In addition, the game itself did not look appealing because you can’t truly test an individual's management skills through a game . 2) Zappos did not accurately engage with members. VIP members who wrote reviews and shopped frequently at Zappos earned badges for being engaged in virtual communities. However, users did not understand why they were given those badges. The lesson is that organizations should not engage with its audience with meaningless communication. Gamification should be used to interact with target audience and give them meaningful incentives to engage with the brand and drive consumer loyalty . Design for Player-Centricity - Leaders in gamification such as Nike, Quirky and Khan Academy share some design characteristics, most notably player-centric design. In each of these cases, the key design point is to motivate the players to achieve their goals. The mistake many companies make is to identify the business objectives without clearly identifying the player objectives. The sweet spot for gamification objectives is where the business objectives and player objectives overlap.
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By: Jessica Gahtan - Gamified applications must be designed to motivate players to achieve their goals. To achieve success for companies starting in gamification, the first design point is to motivate players to achieve their goals – and those goals should overlap with the business goals Bringing Meaning into Gamification - Gamification helps to boost the following metrics: engagement, influence, loyalty, user generated content, time spent, virality, task completion - Although gamification can be a powerful engagement tool, it must be used in the right context, one in which it creates a meaningful, behaviour changing or enhancing user experience. How to gamify correctly 1. Focus on research; identify your target demographic. 2. Identify the needs of the core demographic for the specific product or service. 3. Game strategy: choose an appropriate game that best fits your target user. These decisions can be made through primary or secondary and/or historical research. 4. Release & evaluate strategy; evaluate feedback from consumers: Have you defined your audience segments? Have you created audience personas? Have you identified your users red routes (key tasks)? Do you use a user-
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  • Fall '11
  • DetlevZwick
  • Marketing, Jessica Gahtan

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