Eriksons Psychosocial Theory of Development o Eight Stages o In each stage the

Eriksons psychosocial theory of development o eight

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Erikson’s Psychosocial Theory of DevelopmentoEight StagesoIn each stage, the developing person faces a specific challenge that presents tasks and risksoThe outcome of the challenge determines whether they will move on to the next stageoLeaving each stage is successful development that reflects person’s social relationships with family members, peers, and othersoChildren grow and mature by learning to deal with new expectations and changesCurrent Social Issues and Children’s Well-Being -The Impact of Electronic MediaoCan be educational, but parents often use them as nanniesoChildren and adolescents who watch a lot of TV do poorly in school-Children at RiskoObesity rate has increasedoSome kids still don’t have health insuranceoUS has the highest child poverty rates-Foster CareoPrevalence of Foster HomesRecent years have seen a dramatic growth in kinship careoProblems of Foster HomesMany children go through multiple placements and remain in foster care until late adolescenceSystem may worsen physical and mental health problemsFoster children are disadvantaged in attaining a higher educationoBenefits of Foster HomesPhysical and emotional safetyChapter 13: Key Terms:-Wealth: the money and economic assets that a person or family owns, including property and income-Income: the amount of money a person receives, usually through wages or salaries, but can also include rents, interest on savings accounts, dividends on stock, or the proceeds from a business-Corporate welfare: an array of direct subsidies, tax breaks, and indirect assistance that the government has created for the special benefit of businesses-Absolute poverty: not having enough money to afford the most basic necessities of life such as food, clothing, or shelter-Relative poverty: not having enough money to maintain an average standard of living-Poverty line: the minimum income level determined by the federal government to be necessary for individuals and families basic subsistence-Feminization of poverty: the growing proportion of women and their children who are poor-Working poor: people who spend at least 27weeks in the labor force (working or looking for work) but whose family of personal income falls below the official poverty level-Discouraged worker: an unemployed person who wants to work but who has recently given up the search for a position because of the belief that the job hunt is futile-Underemployed worker: a person who holds part-time jobs but would rather work full time or who accepts jobs below his or her level of expertise-Two-person single career: an arrangement in which one spouse participates in the other’s career behind the scenes without pay or direct recognition-Dual-earner couple: both partners work outside the home
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8HDF 304 Exam 3 Review-Discretionary income: money remaining after essentials, such as rent or mortgage, food, utilities, and transportation costs, have been paid and that people can then spend as they please-
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