As of 2015 the estimated number of drug courts

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dependency problems. As of 2015, the estimated number of drug courts operating in the U.S. is over 3,000. The majority target adults, including DWI (driving while intoxicated) offenders and a growing number of Veterans; others address juvenile, child welfare, and different case types. Since its 1993 evaluation of the first drug court (the Miami-Dade County Felony Drug Court), NIJ has sponsored research examining drug court processes, outcomes and costs. In 2015 the most people
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Specialized Courts Paper 4 arrested and put in drug court is adults. The number of adults put in drug court is 1,558. Juveniles with drugs are 409. Driving while Influence (DWI) 289 was put in drug court. Drug courts are usually managed by a non-adversarial and multidisciplinary team including judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, community corrections, social workers and treatment service professionals. Support from stakeholders representing law enforcement, the family and the community is encouraged through participation in hearings, programming and events like graduation. The length of the Drug Court Program is determined by each participant’s progress and will be a minimum of one year and no longer than two years. Drug Courts keep nonviolent drug-addicted individuals in treatment for long periods of time, supervise them closely. Clients receive the treatment and other services they require to stay clean and to lead productive lives, but they are also held accountable by a judge for meeting their own obligations to society, themselves and their families. They are regularly and randomly tested for drug use, required to appear in court for the judge to review their progress, and receive rewards for doing well and sanctions for not living up to their obligations. Victim Rights Laws Since the early 1970s, attention to the needs and rights of victims has prompted enactment of legislation, changes in public policy, and development of victim services throughout the United States.
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