The statutes governing slavery in the north american

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capital-intense business. The statutes governing slavery in the North American colonies originated in Barbados. Under the Barbados slave code of 1661, slaves were denied the most fundamental rights. One of the earliest and most important exports from the Carolinas was Indian slaves. The colony of South Carolina prospered by developing close economic ties with the British West Indies. Two major exports of the Carolinas were rice and Indian slaves. Some Africans became especially valuable as slaves in the Carolinas because they were experienced in rice cultivation. The busiest seaport in the southern colonies was Charleston. North Carolina and Rhode Island were similar in that they were the two most democratic colonies. The inhabitants of North Carolina were regarded by their neighbors as irreligious. The attitude of Carolinians toward Indians can best be described as hostile. The colony of Georgia was founded as a defensive buffer for South Carolina. Georgia's founders were determined to create a haven for people imprisoned for debt.
Georgia grew very slowly because of its unhealthy climate, early restrictions on black slavery, Spanish attacks and a lack of a plantation economy. Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia were similar in that they were all economically dependent on the export of a staple crop. By 1750, all the southern plantation colonies based their economies on the production of staple crops for export, practiced slavery, provided tax support for the Church of England, and had few large cities.

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