Fascial adherence In anatomy fascia adherens are ribbon like structures that

Fascial adherence in anatomy fascia adherens are

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Fascial adherence: In anatomy, fascia adherens are ribbon-like structures that stabilize non-epithelial tissue. They are similar in function and structure to the zonula adherens or adherens junction of epithelial cells. It is a broad intercellularjunction in the transversal sections of an intercalated disc of cardiac muscle anchoring actin filaments. It helps to transmit contractile forces. Potential for scalding: Scalding risks are most apparent when a service user is bathed, showered or washed. Over the years, a number of tragic accidents have occurred where care staff have neglected to check the temperature of bath water, for instance, and people have been lowered into scalding water. It is generally accepted that temperatures of 50°C and over present a considerable scalding risk, while temperatures between 45°C and 50°C have also been associated with scalds, especially with prolonged exposure for the elderly or the young. In care homes, wherever such risks are identified, and where hot water is kept at 60°C orabove to maintain safety against Legionella infection, engineering controls should be fitted to ensure that water temperature is reduced to a safe level at outlets such as bath taps or showers. Managing the Risks from Hot Water and Surfaces in Health and Social Care states that, where a risk assessment indicates a possible risk of scalding, water should be prevented from being discharged at more than 44°C from bath, sink or shower taps that are accessible to vulnerable service users, especially in areas where there is the potential for whole-body immersion.
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Task 7: splinting and taping can be used to protect joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments during the healing process. The goal is to restrict motion of the injured tissue while allowing the uninjured joints to remain mobile. This allows the individual to be as functional or active as possible without risk of injury. Taping often plays an important role in an athlete's safe return to competition/sport. Taping is also used to: Prevent spinal flexion during acute episodes of back painTo assist with postural re-educationTo unload an irritated nerve root or muscle.
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