As they are entering an instruction is told to them

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As they are entering, an instruction is told to them at normal voice level, and they are left alone in the room for ten minutes. Inside this room, the lights are off, elevator music is playing. There is a bookshelf, an open closet with various clothing items inside, a table set up with large puzzles, word searches, crayons and coloring sheets, and a comfy sofa and recliner with pillows of various textures, stuffed animals, and blankets. There is a moderator in the room to monitor the activity of the participants. After ten minutes, the lights are turned on without warning, and instructions are given for the participants to return to the doorway so they can head back to the classroom. Any participants who do not hear or comprehend the instructions are assisted back to the doorway and led back down the hall single file to the point where they met outside the classroom. The headphones are removed, as are the gloves, and finally the goggles, and they are reminded not to discuss their experiences until everyone has had a chance to go, and are then led back inside to take their seats or look at the displayed materials while the other groups have a turn.
FINAL DESIGN BLUEPRINT 13 Every group has gone through the immersive experience, and all participants of the training have been returned to the classroom. I as the instructor ask the participants what they experienced, and if anyone knows what the simulation was meant to convey. It is explained that the immersive experience is meant to simulate some of the experiences that a person with Alzheimer’s will undergo and live with on a daily basis. The goggles reflect the various diseases and failings of the eyes as we age, such as macular degeneration, oncoming blindness, glaucoma, and effects of diabetes. The gloves reflect the natural progression of loss of coordination and numbness in the fingers and hands, and the headphones represent all the other distractions that are going on around us that we are able to “tune out”, but ends up causing irritation or distraction in the Alzheimer’s population. I will ask participants that wish to share, what exactly they experienced, and share my experience the first time I had this experience as well. I will also ask for the volunteers that monitored the room to share what they observed as well, and we will make the connections between our actions and those of our residents. There will be further conversation about how hopefully the immersive experience will stick with them and they will remember how they felt the next time they are assisting a resident who may not quite be acting the way they would like, and reiterate that our residents do not intentionally do things that cause us frustration, that it is a natural progression of the disease they live with.

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