o Issues that lower your writing project grade Youll learn a lot through

O issues that lower your writing project grade youll

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o Issues that lower your writing project grade: You’ll learn a lot through participating in peer review workshops; these occur on days that your writing project drafts are due, and in them you’ll both give and receive extensive feedback on your project drafts. If you aren’t here, or you don’t participate, your work and the work of your class colleagues is affected. Except by prearrangement, if you miss a peer review workshop (for whatever reason), or if you come to the workshop without a draft or unwilling to participate, your grade for that writing project will be lowered to partial credit. o Issues that lower your final grade by half (from B to B-, for example): a pattern of lateness (3+ times); a lack of participation/preparedness (3+ times); absences (4th) o Issues that lower your final grade by one full grade (from B to C, for example: lack of preparation/preparedness (5+ times); 6th absence= final grade lowered by one grade (from B to C, for example).
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o On your 7th absence, you must withdraw from the course and take it in a semester better suited for your schedule. This is a First-Year Writing Program policy. 20%: Reading journal entries and writing explorations: There will be at least two explorations and 4-6 reading journal entries per project. Criteria will be shared with you on your writing project assignment sheet. Reading journal entries and writing explorations must be complete *prior* to a writing project’s due date. Writing projects cannot be assessed without completed process work. 30%: Writing Projects: o Writing Project One: 10% o Writing Project Two: 10% o Writing Project Three: 10% 50%: Final Portfolio: The final portfolio is assessed according to a rubric, based on the course outcomes. We will review the rubric ahead of time You must submit all writing projects on their due date to receive full credit. All writing projects must be completed (even if they receive no credit) in order to pass the class. If these are not turned in throughout the semester, regardless of whether you turn in a final portfolio, you will not pass the class. Writing projects must be submitted on time in order to be revised. Portfolio grading Near the end of the semester, you will have the opportunity to revisit and revise selected pieces for your final portfolio. We’ll work together to build a rubric for the final portfolio that accurately reflects the work we do together in the class. At this point, your work—as a collection of pieces that demonstrate some range of your work in this course—will be graded with a letter grade. One thing we know about writing (and that we’ll talk a lot about this semester) is that writing is a process: the best writers write more drafts, not fewer. So, your initial work through a unit, building towards a new kind of writing project, is assessed for thoroughness. If you’ve made a thoughtful, thorough effort at all of the work for the unit, then it won’t be hard to get full credit. (Conversely, it’s pretty easy to earn partial or no credit by not doing the work or not doing it thoughtfully.) As you’ll notice, the final portfolio is worth half of your grade. This is because you’ll
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  • Spring '11
  • Bailey
  • Writing, Academia, Composition studies, Boise State University

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