The great plains and the western frontier until the

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the Great Plains and the Western frontier until the US government was able to squash conflict and confine the Natives to Indian reservations. Battle of Little Bighorn The Battle of Little Bighorn, also known as Custer’s Last Stand, was an epic failure by US Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry to defeat a conglomerated force of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes people. Custer died alongside five out of the seven companies under his command, and their deaths were glorified by Custer’s wife, Libbie Custer, making them heroic symbols of the Great Sioux War of 1876. Assimilationists Assimilationists were those who advocated for racial and cultural assimilation into American society. Many Assimilationists in the 1800s were violent in their approach, however, and often forced the adoption of American culture on groups such as the Native Americans, as seen with the Dawes Act. Dawes Severalty Act The Dawes Severalty Act, or simply the Dawes Act, was passed by Congress in 1887 as an effort to further the assimilation process of Native Americans, who retained some of their tribal cultures. Another main goal of the act was to privatize land ownership of formerly-native land, giving the opportunity to whites to acquire the land legally from the Natives. Ghost Dance Movement (Wounded Knee)
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The Ghost Dance Movement was a religious movement among those of Native American descent. The movement amalgamated the religions of several native peoples, and promised the restoration of native lands and the removal of white colonists. The Ghost Dance Movement also contributed to the Lakota tribe’s resistance to assimilation under the Dawes act, culminating in the Wounded Knee Massacre, in which United States troops surrounded a Lakota encampment and, through confusion, ended up confiscating their weapons and massacring up to 300 native men, women, and children. Gold Standard Act The Gold Standard Act, signed into law by President McKinley in 1900, made gold the only standard for redeeming paper money. This effectively replaced the Coinage Act of 1873 and ended the practice of bimetallism.
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