On the other hand you might find that the interviewee

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On the other hand, you might find that the interviewee has something in her background that you really appreciate or can iden- tify with, and this seems to resonate with you even before you have gone through the full interview process. This is a tendency that must be brought to a conscious level and guarded against. There are many examples of interviewers saying, ‘‘I liked this guy the instant I met him. I think we should hire him.’’ Odds are, their behavior patterns were exactly the same. People like people who are similar to themselves. This is where the expression ‘‘hiring in one’s own image’’ comes from. Another example is when the job vacancy might just seem so important to fill that you feel pressured to move quickly. Remember: A hasty decision is rarely a good one. Rather, we must continually remind ourselves that effective personnel selection is in the best interest of both the applicant and the company. In fact, harm can be done both to the individual and the company when an unqualified person is hired and set up for
121 Recruiting, Interviewing, and Hiring the Very Best failure. It is simply not in the best interest of anyone involved to place someone in a position for which they are poorly suited and that will ultimately end in failure. The purpose of this part of the interview is twofold: 1. To observe obvious discrepancies in the candidate’s image or personality, according to the intended plan and criteria. 2. To determine what areas might be needed in order to further train, develop, and motivate the individual once hired. Unless there is an obvious mismatch, managers should, at this point, avoid either hiring or not hiring. The other area to explore relates to specifics about the individ- ual in terms of work, school, and any other pertinent information that could relate to the position. Here you can use the re ´sume ´ or application to ask about certain specifics, for example: 1. Clarify those ‘‘red flags’’: gaps between jobs, horizontal moves, several moves, major salary changes, etc. 2. Clarify positions held: job description, duties, accomplish- ments, etc. 3. Some useful questions to ask that relate to his job (if currently employed) are: What do you like about your job? What do you dislike about your job? In what areas do you know you excel and how? What is the greatest challenge for you, and how do you try and overcome it? How do you think your coworkers would describe you? Answers to these questions could further help to expose the concerns, strengths, weaknesses, and motivational factors of that in- dividual. Of course, while a candidate should feel comfortable asking a question at any time, it is at this stage that you would more formally solicit questions from the interviewee. Keep in mind that her list of questions might very well shed even more light on her. For exam- ple, an interviewee might ask questions such as:
122 F U N D A M E N T A L S O F S A L E S M A N A G E M E N T Does the company have and contribute to the employees’ 401(k) plan?

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