The celebration of jamaicas three hundredth

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chances of a Labour victory. The celebration of Jamaica's three hundredth anniversary of British rule in 1955--at which Princess Margaret was the principal (19 of 28) [3/21/2005 9:35:22 AM]
"Cultural Racism" and Colonial Caribbean Migrants in Core Zones of the Capitalist World-Economy guest--also made it inopportune to present what would have appeared as 'anti- Jamaican Bill.' This was underlined by the feeling in some quarters that colonial development and not legislation was the solution to immigration. Finally, the measure refused leave on the grounds that it was too important a measure to be left to a Private Member ... (1987: 343). ) The measure was again presented as a Draft Bill in the Cabinet by the Home Secretary in October, 1955. The same objections to Osborne's Bill were put forward. But, in addition, new arguments were raised in the November 3 Cabinet meeting. First, they realized that there was no consent in public opinion towards this racist bill. Secondly, colonial immigration recognized as a means of increasing British labor resources (Caxter et al., 1987: 344). For the first time there were arguments in Cabinet meetings about the economic benefits of immigrants. Thirdly, there was recognition that immigration could be stopped by creating jobs in the colonies. The advantage of this alternative was that it would not jeopardize British capital and the reconstruction of the Empire in the colonial territories. As a result, the British Cabinet did not approve the bill. Since the extension of full citizen rights to Blacks with the passing of the 1948 Nationality Act, there have been dissident voices against colonial migrants. From many circles, including British labor, there was a questioning of this legislation based on a racialized construction of Britishness. The latter excluded and included groups based on skin color. Belonging to British national identity was equivalent to being White, whereas immigrants and foreigners were associated with being Black. These racialized identities continued throughout the 1950's. The 1958 anti-Black riots in Nottingham and Notting Hill were the turning point that shifted British public opinion in favor of black immigration control. From then on it was a matter of time before the controls were actually approved. By July 1, 1962, the government approved an immigration control bill prohibiting the continued flow of migrants from Commonwealth territories to the Motherland. Great Britain was the only country to impose state controls over colonial Caribbean migrations to the metropole. Although migration from the Commonwealth colonies significantly declined after this date, the existence of a Black British minority was already an irreversible process. The success and influence of African-American Civil Rights struggles in the early 1960's stimulated and fostered Black British struggles. The 1968 Race Relations (20 of 28) [3/21/2005 9:35:22 AM]
"Cultural Racism" and Colonial Caribbean Migrants in Core Zones of the Capitalist World-Economy Bill was an important achievement by the anti-racist movement. However, this Bill

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