TINA_Advanced_Topics.pdf

Using the arc settings you can draw an arc between

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Using the Arc settings, you can draw an arc between Cout and Vgen by setting Vgen in the Arc.Draw to listbox of the Cout vector’s configuration dialog box. You can also set the radius of the arc in pixels and choose whether the smaller (<=180 ° ) or the bigger arc (>180 ° ) should be displayed. Next, you can add labels to all the vectors at once by pressing the legend button on the toolbar. You can also add legends individually: press the Auto label button, then select the vectors one-by-one. The actual label format depends on the selected Vector label style under the View menu. Finally, you can add lines, circles, or texts to finish your diagram.
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This diagram can then be copied to the clipboard and pasted into the schematic editor or any word processing program.
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Nyquist Diagram TINA’s AC transfer analysis can plot not only the Amplitude, Phase and Group delay of the transfer function of analog circuits, but the Nyquist diagram as well. To see how this works, first load the examples\rlc_1.sch circuit. Next, select the Analysis.AC Analysis.AC Transfer Characteristic menu item. Now the AC Transfer Characteristic dialog box appears on screen, where you can select the Frequency ranges of the analysis, the sweep type, and the diagram you want to plot (Amplitude, Phase, Nyquist, Group Delay). Set the frequency from 10k to 1M and set the diagram type to Nyquist. In order to get a smooth curve, increase the Number of point to 1000. Press the OK button and see the Nyquist diagram of the circuit calculated and plotted, as shown in the diagram window.
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This diagram is different from a normal Transient or AC analysis diagram. A Nyquist diagram requires that horizontal and vertical scales always be proportional to each other. This keeps circular curves circular, even if you resize the window. Furthermore, a Nyquist curve presents the trace of a vector quantity as frequency is varied. When you activate a cursor and explore the trace, the cursor dialog shows the numerical values of the curves at a given frequency, in either real-imaginary or amplitude-phase format.
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Noise analysis The minimum signal level which a given circuit can measure or amplify is determined by spontaneous fluctuations occurring in the circuit component. These spontaneous fluctuations are called noise. Noise usually has energy in all parts of the frequency range. TINA calculates the noise contributions of circuit components and then presents them referred to the output. The random noise fluctuations are analyzed statistically, considering the time domain average to be zero, while the variance and sum of the squares are not zero. Noise analysis results can be displayed and printed over a frequency range similar to the Bode diagram of AC analysis. TINA takes into account the noise sources inherent in resistors and semiconductors (transistors, diodes). Resistors are modeled as an ideal noiseless resistor in parallel with an equivalent thermal noise current. This equivalent noise is modelled by white noise, i.e., noise containing all frequency components with the same amplitude density. The contributions of all the noise generators in the circuit
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