Page 8 of 100 As mentioned above YAWL extends Petri nets There are a number of

Page 8 of 100 as mentioned above yawl extends petri

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As mentioned above, YAWL extends Petri nets. There are a number of general introductions to Petri nets in the literature. We refer the interested reader to [ 13 , 11 ]. Wil van der Aalst has written much about the application of Petri nets to workflow, see e.g. [ 1 ]. The subclass of Petri nets introduced by him, Workflow-nets, is a predecessor of YAWL. The textbook that he wrote together with Kees van Hee is highly recommended reading [ 3 ]. A recent textbook on Business Process Management (BPM), which covers the original control-flow patterns and also YAWL, was written by Mathias Weske [ 19 ]. This textbook also covers other approaches, such as the modelling standard BPMN (note that the BPMN2YAWL tool can convert these specifications to YAWL). On the YAWL web site ( yawlfoundation.org ) it can be seen how the original control-flow patterns can be realised in YAWL (follow the link on Resources and then click ‘patterns’). For control-flow patterns in newYAWL the reader can consult appendix A.1 of Nick Russell’s PhD thesis [ 17 ]. If you would like to know more about how verification of YAWL specifications really works, we refer you to [ 18 ] and to [ 20 ]. This work forms the theoretical basis of how the verification mechanisms are realised in the YAWL editor. In-depth discussion of YAWL’s exception handling framework from a conceptual point of view can be found in [ 17 , 15 ] and from an implementation aspect in [ 6 , 7 ]. YAWL’s worklet approach to dealing with on-the-fly changes to workflows is discussed in [ 6 , 8 ]. The reader that is interested in declarative specification of workflow is referred to [ 12 ]. On the Declare web site, declare.sf.net , the Declare service for YAWL can be downloaded. Further documentation about this approach can also be found there. YAWL has a close link to the Process Mining environment ProM [ 2 ], . This link is for example exploited in [ 14 ] to provide simulation support for YAWL. There exists support for exporting YAWL logs to ProM which can subsequently be analysed by one of the many mining plug-ins available in this environment. Alternative ways of presenting work lists have been addressed in [ 9 ]. In this Visualiser framework users can choose a map (not just a geographical map, but also e.g. a timeline or a YAWL specification) and work items can be positioned on this map and be shown in a colour that reflects their level of urgency (a context-specific notion which can be defined for the user). Support for the visualiser framework is provided via the default YAWL worklist handler. Finally, a textbook on YAWL, called Modern Business Process Automation: YAWL and its Support Envi- ronment has been published by Springer (2010; ISBN: 978-3-642-03120-5) [ 10 ]. The book provides a com- prehensive treatment of the field of Business Process Management (BPM) with a focus on Business Process Automation. It achieves this by covering a wide range of topics, both introductory and advanced, illustrated through and grounded in the YAWL language and support environment.
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