If the price of one good increases that means the opportunity cost of buying

If the price of one good increases that means the

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If the price of one good increases, that means the opportunity cost of buying that good and not the other good increases. For example, if the price of oranges increases, the opportunity cost of buying oranges (giving up buying pineapples) increases because you must give up more consumption of pineapples to maintain the same level of orange consumption. If the opportunity cost increases, then you will naturally buy less of that good (i.e. oranges). Thus the answer is (A). (16) - Green Home
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39 II. R EVIEW OF E XAM 2:(18) - WhiteFixed costs are:(17) - Green Econ 2001 Brandon Genetin (A)Costs that are negotiated to stay the same throughout the life of the contract.(B)Costs that dont depend on the quantity of output produced.(C)Input costs that stay the same price per unit.(D)Costs that depend on the quantity of output produced.
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40 II. R EVIEW OF E XAM 2:(18) - WhiteFixed costs are:(17) - Green Econ 2001 Brandon Genetin Home
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41 II. R EVIEW OF E XAM 2:(2) - WhiteBenefits today cannot be directly compared with the costs in the future because:(18) - Green Econ 2001 Brandon Genetin
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42 II. R EVIEW OF E XAM 2:(2) - WhiteBenefits today cannot be directly compared with the costs in the future because:(18) - Green Econ 2001 Brandon Genetin Home
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43 II. R EVIEW OF E XAM 2: Econ 2001 Brandon Genetin (17) - White Average total cost: (19) - Green
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44 II. R EVIEW OF E XAM 2: Econ 2001 Brandon Genetin (17) - White (19) - Green Home
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45 II. R EVIEW OF E XAM 2: Econ 2001 Brandon Genetin (10) - White
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