Etkin makes the connection that unlike restaurant

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Etkin makes the connection that "unlike restaurant fusions, many of the street foods of New York and elsewhere still mark discrete lines ofidentity ... terms like melting pot do not capture the identity forging role of culture-specific public foods (2009: 94)." However, with this new form offood trucks that mostly specialize on fusion cuisine, my thesis is arguing that street food is evolving or branching out into a different manifestation; one that is very synthesized, modern, and different from the usual definitions of street food. Reinventing Urban Spaces and the "On the Go" Street Food Experience: N ow that a little bit of a historical context is in place, in order to see why this street food reinvention-the gourmet food truck-has become so popular, it is necessary to understand why street food caught on so well with the identity of the urban populations of America in the first place. Sociologists and other scholars contend that the allure of street food is the fact that it consists of mainly "ready-to-eat, ready-to-drink items that are packaged in disposable containers, meant to be consumed at or while moving away from the purchase site," (Etkin 2009: 89, Valentine 2006: 201, Smith 2012: 268). This "on the go" eating experience was and is vital to the popularization of street food, but for newer gourmet food trucks, the whole experience is very different than classic notions of cheap and quick that are normally associated with street food. In order to understand this transition, we need to have a deeper knowledge of this "on the go" experience and its implications. 14
In his ethnographic account of how street food has changed the public's view of "the street" and street culture in the UK, Gill Valentine makes an assertion about eating on the move: "Eating on the run transgresses all of the carefully constructed class, gender distinctions, and 'normative' constraints of manners and social graces played out over the dinner table. Alfresco eating creates unpredictable spaces of freedom for the consumer" (2006: 201). The release of social pressure that Valentine refers to here is not specific to street food in the UK, it can be applied to other societies that already had established eating hierarchies and norms associated with private versus public setting for consuming food. This freedom he mentions resonated very well with Americans, and the fact that street food could be eaten while travelling in a car or on foot coincided exceptionally well with the rush and urgency of an urban life in America in the twentieth century. Another place in scholarly debate where the "on the go" food experience occurs is in Michael Pollan's popular book The Omnivore's Dilemma. In this book the author highlights the problems with the industrial food system in America and how it is an ingrained part of our current economy and society. He notions that the changes in farming practices have contributed to the hyper-processing of all foods in America, environmental problems, and the growth offast food chains. At first glance it may seem like the industrial

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