For environments with noise levels exceeding 120 dB more advanced and expensive

For environments with noise levels exceeding 120 db

This preview shows page 3 - 6 out of 13 pages.

than 120 decibels (dB). For environments with noise-levels exceeding 120 dB, more advanced and expensive hearing protection is required, such as ear-muffs. Data have been collected for the primary variables that are believed to contribute to excessive noise. It would be important if these data could be used to predict the dB levels of work environments before placing employees on site. New Employee Training All new Sun Coast employees participate in general health and safety training. The training program was revamped and implemented six months ago. Data is available for two Groups; a) Group A employees who participated in the previous training program, and b) Group
Image of page 3
UNIT II - SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY SUN COAST 4 B employees who participated in the revised training program. It is necessary to know if the revised training program is more effective than the prior training program. Lead Exposure Employees working on job sites to remediate lead must be monitored. Lead levels in blood are measured as micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (μg/dL). A base-line is taken pre-exposure, then post-exposure at regular intervals, and at the conclusion of the remediation. Data are available for 49 employees who recently concluded a two-year-long lead remediation project. It is necessary to determine if blood lead levels have increased. Return-On-Investment Sun Coast would like to know if all lines of service provide the same return-on- investment. Return-on-investment data is available for air monitoring, soil remediation, water reclamation, and health and safety training. If return-on-investment is not the same for all lines of service, it would be helpful to know where differences exist. Literature Review Particulate Matter (PM) PM between 10 and 2.5 microns can float in the air for minutes to hours (e.g. asbestos, mold spores, pollen, cement dust, fly ash), while PM less than 2.5 microns can float in the air for hours to weeks (e.g. bacteria, viruses, oil smoke, smog, soot). Brook et al had an update to the Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, on May 10, 2010. According to their review, exposure to PM <2.5 μm in diameter (PM 2.5 ) over a few hours to weeks can provoke cardiovascular disease and longer-term exposure (eg, a few years) makes an increase in the risk for cardiovascular mortality; vice versa, reductions in PM levels are related to decreases in cardiovascular mortality. Their conclusion
Image of page 4
UNIT II - SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY SUN COAST 5 stated that PM 2.5 exposure is judged a modifiable factor that contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Fann et al (2017) conducted a research to Estimate Changes in Life Expectancy and Adult Mortality Resulting from Declining PM 2.5 Exposures in the Contiguous United States: 1980– 2010. They aimed to estimate changes in the numbers of deaths and in life years and life expectancy at birth, attributable to changes in PM 2.5. The result of their research stated that the declines in PM 2.5 exposures between 1980 and 2010 have benefited public health.
Image of page 5
Image of page 6

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 13 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture