When youre away from home you need to find a wifi

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When you’re away from home, you need to find a WiFi hotspot. Many public places, such as libraries, hotels, airports, and fast-food and coffee shops, offer WiFi access. Most locations are free, though a few still charge or require a special password to access the connection. When you’re not in a WiFi hotspot but still need to access the Internet, you may want to consider mobile broadband. Mobile broadband connects you to the Internet through the same cellular network that cell phones use to get 3G or 4G Internet access. 3G and 4G can be thought of as “WiFi everywhere” in that they provide Internet access to your mobile devices in the same way they provide voice service to your mobile phone. 3G and 4G refer to the third and fourth generations, respectively, of cell-phone networks. 4G is the latest service standard and offers the fastest data- access speeds over cell-phone networks. 3G performs similarly to a standard DSL connection (roughly 3 Mbps). According to the standards set for 4G, the data transfer rate you would get while in a moving vehicle is approximately 100 Mbps; from a fixed location, you can expect up to a 1 Gbps data transfer rate. Some of the early 4G systems released in the market support less than the required 1 Gbps rate and are not fully compliant with the 4G standards and so are being tagged as 4G LTE. They are still faster than 3G, however. If your device doesn’t have built-in 3G or 4G equipment, you can connect to the Internet using a mobile hotspot. Mobile hotspots let you connect more than one device to the Internet but require access to a data plan. 5.10 Summarize the pros and cons of dial-up connections. Although about 90% of Internet users in the United States use high-speed Internet connections such as DSL, cable, or fiber-optic, there are still some areas (usually rural) where broadband service isn’t available. A dial-up connection needs only a standard phone line and a modem to access the Internet. Therefore, some people choose to use a dial-up connection when there’s no highspeed service in their area. Additionally, a dial-up connection is the least costly way to connect to the Internet, so for those who don’t use the Internet frequently, the extra cost of broadband may be unnecessary. 56
The major downside to dial-up is speed. Dial-up modems transfer data about 600 times slower than a fiber-optic broadband connection. Also, dial-up uses a traditional phone line to connect to the Internet; therefore, unless you have a separate phone line just for your dial-up connection, when you’re using dial-up, you tie up your phone line. 5.11 Explain steps you should take before creating a home network. Planning Your Home Network • List all the devices you are using • Use the latest standards • Use the newest equipment 1) Evaluate your network is list all the devices you’re using. Consider not only the obvious devices such as computers, laptops, tablets, and printers, but also include smartphones, DVR boxes, smart TVs, wireless stereo equipment, and any other

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