The Senate can confirm Presidential appointees where the House does not and the

The senate can confirm presidential appointees where

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certain limits when it comes to amending bills. The Senate can confirm Presidential appointees, where the House does not and the House has the power to impeach a President, but only the Senate can try them. Powers The Constitution grants both Congress and the President certain powers. According to "American Government"(2019), “The Constitution specifically grants Congress its most important power — the authority to make laws. A BILL, or proposed law, only becomes a law after both the House of Representatives and the Senate have approved it in the same form. The two houses share other powers, many of which are listed in Article I, Section 8. These include the power to declare war, coin money, raise an army and navy, regulate commerce, establish rules of immigration and naturalization, and establish the federal courts and their jurisdictions.” The President is granted specific powers within the Constitution, those powers include being the Commander and Chief of the armed forces which means he can take military action without declaring war. He is the head of the Administrative State and this means he is responsible for carrying out how a law will be enforced. The President has the power to appoint officials who he believes will do a good job and match his views. The President also has the power to make agreements with other heads of state to create trade deals or orchestrate treaties and agreements. Signing and/or vetoing bills is another duty of the President. Congress makes the law, but it is approved or disapproved by the President. Checks and Balances
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4 No one branch can have more power than the other. This was put into play to prevent the previous rule like that of the British King they fought so hard to get away from, thus the centralized government was created. In the United States, the checks and balances in the Federal government were established in the Constitution by dividing the government into an executive branch, a legislative branch divided into two houses, and a judicial branch.
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  • Fall '15
  • Government, Separation of Powers, President of the United States, United States Congress

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