B were an opinion a personal possession of no value

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b)      Were an opinion a personal possession of no value except to the owner, if to be obstructed in  the enjoyment of it were simply a private injury, it would make some difference whether the injury  was inflicted only on a few persons or on many. c)      But the peculiar evil of silencing the expression of an opinion is that it is robbing the human  race, posterity as well as the existing generation-those who dissent from the opinion, still more than  those who hold it. d)     If the opinion is right, they are deprived of the opportunity of exchanging error for truth; if wrong, they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth  produced by its collision with error.   e)      We can never be sure that the opinion we are endeavouring to stifle is a false opinion; and if  we were sure, stifling it would be an evil still. f)       Possibly, the opinion which it is attempted to suppress by authority may possibly be true.
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g)      Those who desire to suppress it, of course, deny its truth; but they are not infallible. h)      They have no authority to decide the question for all mankind and exclude every other person  from the means of judging. i)        To refuse a hearing to an opinion because they are sure that it is false is to assume that their  certainty is the same thing as absolute certainty. j)        All silencing of discussion is an assumption of infallibility. Its condemnation may be allowed to  rest on this common argument, not the worse of being common. k)      Thus: So long as the freedom one enjoys does not infringe on the freedom and Rights of  others in the wider society, then the government authority has no otherwise but to allow individual  persons to exercise and enjoy their liberties of holding opinion, association and expression. The  natural laws bestow restrictions on the acts of man.    The maxim:  Do to others what you would want others to do unto you. 1.42 SUMMARY Mill states that it is acceptable to harm oneself as long as the person doing so is not harming others.  He also argues that individuals should be prevented from doing lasting, serious harm to themselves  or their property by theharm principle. Because no one exists in isolation, harm done to oneself may  also harm others, and destroying property deprives the community as well as oneself. Mill excuses  those who are "incapable of self government" from this principle, such as young children or those  living in "backward states of society".
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