How genetics gender ethnic age and behavioral factors impact Anemia Iron

How genetics gender ethnic age and behavioral factors

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needs iron to make hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells (RBCs) that carries oxygen.How genetics, gender, ethnic, age, and behavioral factors impact AnemiaIron deficiency anemia includes diagnosis and correction of underlying causes, most of which are identifiable, in the older patient, by means of conventional upper gastrointestinal endoscopy; Anemia should not be accepted as an inevitable consequence of aging. The most common causes of anemia in the elderly are a chronic disease and iron deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, gastrointestinal bleeding and myelodysplasia syndrome are among
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other causes of anemia in the elderly. The most common causes of IDA observed in children include inadequate intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal lossesdue to excessive consumption of cow’s milk. Infants and children no getting enough iron are essential for normal growth and development. Infants and children can be at high risk for iron-deficiency anemia because they are growing so quickly. Some infants are at particularly high riskfor iron-deficiency anemia. These include premature or low-birth-weight babies and babies who are fed formula that is not fortified with iron. Infants who are fed only breast milk for longer than 6 months and not given iron supplements also are at high risk. Infants and young children who follow a diet with few iron-containing foods also are at high risk. Young children who had iron-deficiency anemia as infants also are at high risk for continuing to have this form of anemia. Studies have shown that normal iron levels are needed for healthy brain development. Therefore, it is important to identify and treat iron-deficiency anemia, even if the anemia is not severe. The body’s need for iron is higher during the teen years.Teen boys and girls need extra iron because their bodies are growing and developing quickly. Many teens can’t keep up with this demand because their diets are low in iron-containing foods and, for girls, because of blood loss doing menstruation. Women of childbearing age during the childbearing years, women are at greater risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood loss during menstruation and high iron demands during pregnancy. About 1 in every 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia.
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  • Fall '17
  • keisha lovence

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