Why its interesting Doing no environmental harm is no longer enough As these

Why its interesting doing no environmental harm is no

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Why it's interesting: Doing no environmental harm is no longer enough. As these projects prove, the future of travel, tourism and hospitality will be rooted in conscious contributions to a carbon-positive future. TRAVEL & HOSPITALITY THE FUTURE 100 55
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Oslo Airport City renders TRAVEL & HOSPITALITY THE FUTURE 100 56
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As popular sightseeing destinations become overrun with tourists, new regulations are limiting entry and laying the groundwork for a future iteration of luxury travel. With over-trafficking putting culturally significant sites in danger of destruction, gatekeepers are enforcing stricter measures for those who wish to visit—or closing them to the public altogether. Uluru is a sacred site for Australia’s aboriginal Anangu people. For decades the remote rock in the Northern Territory has annually attracted hundreds of thousands of tourists intent on scaling the summit—in spite of the many signs imploring visitors to stay off the rock, both out of respect for the Anangu people and for their own safety. “It is an extremely important place, not a playground or theme park like Disneyland,” Anangu community member Sammy Wilson, former chair of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park board, told the BBC. In October 2019, the site permanently closed to climbers in deference to the Anangu people. Yet in the face of impending closure tourist numbers significantly increased: Parks Australia reported that the site received 70,000 more visitors in 2018 than in 2017, when the ban was announced. Gated tourism Uluru. Image courtesy of Parks Australia TRAVEL & HOSPITALITY THE FUTURE 100 57
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Overcrowding is occurring worldwide. In April 2019, during the Netherlands’ famous tulip festival, barriers were erected in an attempt to prevent tourists from destroying the fields of flowers in their pursuit of the perfect picture. In an interview that appeared in the Guardian , translated from Dutch paper Algemeen Dagblad , Simon Pennings, a grower near the town of Noordwijkerhout in the bulb region of south-west Netherlands, remarked that the visitors “are so careless.” He said that while the large groups of people visiting can be fun, they flatten everything. “It is a shame and we suffer damage as a result. Last year, I had a plot with €10,000 ($11,000) in damage. Everything was trampled… They want to take that selfie anyway.” In addition to the tulip fields being fenced off, the Dutch tourism board released a dos and don’ts guide to photographing the flowers. The local tourist office also organized a group of ambassadors to teach visitors about the history of the fields and the work that goes into maintaining them. In March 2019, the Washington Post reported that Lake Elsinore, a small city in southern California, declared a public safety crisis after “Disneyland-size crowds” descended to witness a rare “super bloom” of wildflowers. In order to protect such landmarks—not to mention the safety, livelihood and religion of local inhabitants—many sites are instituting new requirements for entry. In December 2018 the renowned I Amsterdam sign in front of the city’s
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