Transformations from BPMN to BPEL have also been studied in prior work 187 and

Transformations from bpmn to bpel have also been

This preview shows page 370 - 372 out of 664 pages.

to enable the analysis of BPMN diagrams using existing static analysis techniques. Transformations from BPMN to BPEL have also been studied in prior work [187] and they have been implemented in various tools, including commercial tools. The purpose of the BPMN to BPEL transformation is to enable the execution of BPMN diagrams using existing BPEL orchestration engines. However, in some cases, this transformation may lead to complex and unreadable BPEL process definitions that may subsequently be hard to debug and to maintain. In contrast, the transformation from BPMN to YAWL discussed in this chapter is very direct. One could conceive collaborative modeling environments in which some stakeholders will see a BPMN view of a process model, while others would see an equivalent YAWL net. Given the direct relations between BPMN and YAWL, it would be possible to maintain these views “in sync.” The only issue would be to restrict changes in the YAWL view so that any change can be propagated into the BPMN view.
Image of page 370
Chapter 14 EPCs Jan Mendling 14.1 Introduction This chapter discusses the relationship between YAWL and Event-Driven Process Chains (EPCs). EPCs were introduced in the early 1990s when major software vendors identified the need for a business-oriented representation of system func- tionality in order to speed up the rollout of business software in companies. Back then, the Institute of Information Systems (IWi) in Saarbr¨ucken, Germany, collabo- rated with SAP on a project to define a suitable business process modeling language for documenting processes of the SAP R/3 enterprise resource planning system. There were two results from this joint effort: the definition of EPCs as a modeling language and the documentation of the SAP system in the SAP Reference Model as a collection of EPC process models. This SAP Reference Model had a huge impact on industry and research, with several publications referring to it. It also motivated the creation of further EPC reference models, for example, in computer integrated manufacturing, logistics, and retail. EPCs are frequently used in real-world projects due to a high user acceptance and extensive tool support. Some examples of tools that support EPCs are ARIS Toolset by IDS Scheer AG, ADONIS by BOC GmbH, and Visio by Microsoft Corp. There is also a tool-neutral interchange format called EPC Markup Language (EPML). While EPCs and YAWL share most of their simple and advanced routing ele- ments, there are some subtle differences that are important to know before mapping them. The aim of this chapter is to clarify commonalities and differences and to dis- cuss how transformations can be specified. Against this background, it is organized as follows. Section 14.2 revisits the Carrier Appointment process as an example to introduce EPCs. Section 14.3 then uses the 20 original workflow patterns to highlight commonalities and some important differences between both languages.
Image of page 371
Image of page 372

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 664 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes