Moore BA Penk WE 2011 Treating PTSD in military personnel A clinical handbook

Moore ba penk we 2011 treating ptsd in military

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Moore, B.A., & Penk, W.E. (2011). Treating PTSD in military personnel: A clinical handbook. New York, NY. The Guilford Press . Perret, G. (2011). There’s a war to be won: The United States Army in World War II. New York, NY. Random House Inc . U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (2018). VA National Suicide Data Report 2005-2015. Office of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Publication. TOPIC 3 DQ 1 What levels of evidence are present in relation to research and practice and why are they important regardless of the method you use? Evaluating the evidence from medical studies can be a complex process, involving an understanding of study methodologies, reliability and validity, as well as how these apply to specific study types. Level of evidence scales are rating scales. They provide a rating of the strength of the evidence, ranging from a summary to a manufacturer’s recommendation. The higher the evidence is in the hierarchy, the stronger the evidence. How the strength of the evidence is judged varies among the rating scales. Strength may be identified according to the type of study design and may also consider how rigorous the research methodology was in relation to the type of study design and/or the results of the study. The strength of the evidence is usually designated with numbers (e.g., Level 1,2,3 or
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Level I, II, III) or qualifiers of study quality such as “high” or “low.” Some LOE scales use letter grades (e.g., Level A, B, C). Levels of evidence are assigned to studies based on the methodological quality of their design, validity, and applicability to patient care. These decisions give the "grade (or strength) of recommendation. The systematic review or meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and evidence-based practice guidelines are the strongest level of evidence on which to guide practice decisions. (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2015) The weakest level of evidence is the opinion from authorities and/or reports of expert committees. Levels of evidence from one or more studies provide the grade (or strength) of recommendation for a treatment, test, or practice. Levels of evidence are reported for studies published in some medical and nursing journals. They are most visible in Practice Guidelines, where the level of evidence is used to indicate how strong a recommendation for a practice is. This allows health care professionals to quickly ascertain the weight or importance of the recommendation in any given guideline (Fineout- Overholt & Johnston, 2005). Fineout-Overholt, E., & Johnston, L. (2005). Teaching EBP: Asking searchable, answerable clinical questions. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 2(3), 157-160. Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2015). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: A guide to best practice (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health. TOPIC 3 DQ2 What factors must be assessed when critically appraising quantitative studies (i.e., validity, reliability, and applicability)? Which is the most important? Why?
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