Note XenServer 60 moved from MBR disk partitioning to GUID Partition Table GPT

Note xenserver 60 moved from mbr disk partitioning to

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Note: XenServer 6.0 moved from MBR disk partitioning to GUID Partition Table (GPT). Some third- party PXE deployment systems may attempt to read the partition table on a machine's hard disk before deploying the image to the host. If the deployment system has not been updated to be compatible with GPT partitioning scheme, and the hard disk has previously been used for a version of XenServer (or any other Operating System) that uses GPT, the PXE deployment system may fail. If this happens, a workaround is to delete the partition table on the disk. In addition to the TFTP and DHCP servers, you need an NFS, FTP, or HTTP server to house the XenServer installation files. These servers can co-exist on one, or be distributed across different servers on the network. Additionally, each XenServer host that you want to PXE boot needs a PXE boot-enabled Ethernet card. The following steps assume that the Linux server you are using has RPM support. To configure your TFTP server: 1. In the /tftpboot directory, create a new directory called xenserver . 2. Copy the mboot.c32 and pxelinux.0 files from the /usr/lib/syslinux directory to the / tftboot directory. Note: Citrix strongly recommends using mboot.c32 and pxelinux.0 files from the same source (for example, from the same XenServer ISO). 3. From the XenServer installation media, copy the files install.img (from the root directory), vmlinuz and xen.gz (from the /boot directory) to the new /tftpboot/xenserver directory on the TFTP server. 4. In the /tftboot directory, create a new directory called pxelinux.cfg . 5. In the pxelinux.cfg directory, create your new configuration file called default . The content of this file depends on how you want to configure your PXE boot environment. Two sample configurations are listed below. The first example configuration starts an installation on any machine that boots from the TFTP server and leaves you to manually respond to the installation prompts. The second performs an unattended installation. Note: The following examples show how to configure the installer to run on the physical console, tty0 . To use a different default, ensure that the console you want to use is the rightmost.
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42 default xenserver label xenserver kernel mboot.c32 append /tftpboot/xenserver/xen.gz dom0_max_vcpus=1-2 dom0_mem=752M,max:752M com1=115200,8n1 \ console=com1,vga --- /tftpboot/xenserver/vmlinuz \ xencons=hvc console=hvc0 console=tty0 \ --- /tftpboot/xenserver/install.img A sample configuration that performs an unattended installation using the answer file at the URL specified: Note: To specify which network adapter should be used for retrieving the answer file, include the answerfile_device=ethX or answerfile_device=MAC parameter and specify either the ethernet device number or the MAC address of the device. default xenserver-auto label xenserver-auto kernel mboot.c32 append /tftpboot/xenserver/xen.gz dom0_max_vcpus=1-2 dom0_mem=752M,max:752M com1=115200,8n1 console=com1,vga --- /tftpboot/xenserver/vmlinuz \ xencons=hvc console=hvc0 console=tty0 \ answerfile=\ install --- /tftpboot/xenserver/install.img For more information on PXE configuration file syntax, see the SYSLINUX website.
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