{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Metamorphoses

Ovids irregular writing style is quickly introduced

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ovid’s irregular writing style is quickly introduced with an unpleasant image of Apollo’s attempt to rape Daphne. The reader may say oh, “a tragic event, how epic-like of Ovid”, but that thought is quickly turned into comic relief by his clever writing tactics. He says, “And yet Apollo loves her still; he leans against the trunk; he feels the heart that beasts beneath the new-made bark; within his arms he clasps the branches as if they were human limbs; and his lips kiss the wood, but it still shrinks from his embrace, at which he cries, “But since you cannot be my wife, you’ll be my tree.” (Ovid 1141)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 While Ovid depicts the gods’ behavior as vulgar and immoral, he simultaneously shows the funnier side of it. Ovid’s real battles do not involve men such as Perseus, but musicians and artists. In Book V, the “battle” is a song competition between the Pierides and the Muses. In placing the song competition so close to the wedding banquet fight, Ovid cleverly points out how, to him, a true battle of two epic poems is much more interesting than a battle of two men and their allies. Numerous men’s lives are at stake during the wedding banquet battle, but the stakes are could
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 2

Ovids irregular writing style is quickly introduced with an...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon bookmark
Ask a homework question - tutors are online