left a large footprint on land ate more than land could supply seeding the land

Left a large footprint on land ate more than land

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-left a large footprint on land, ate more than land could supply -seeding the land- they did it because they figured that they would populate and live off the land for themselves making more food -By 1619, 80,000 head of cattle were taken for their hides near Buenos Aires each year without decreasing the size of wild heards -By 1700, there were about 48 million head of cattle in Argentina Spanish Mastiff
The Columbian Exchange European Plants: A landscape Transformed (and a World Creolized) -From the Americas to Europe Foodstuffs Increased Calories Increased Fats Disease –Syphilis They don’t eat NO corn in Europe American Crops and European Population Growth Caloric Values of old and new world crops Old World Wheat 1.8 Oats 2.3 Barley 2.1 New World Maize (corn): 3.2 Potatoes 3.3 Sweet Potatoes: 3.3 Syphilis and Historians Native American Societies Paleo-Indians (35000- 400) Arcaic Indians (4000- 1500) Woodland Cultures (1500- contact period) Mississippian Cultures (1000-1450) Effects of Agriculture on Native American Societies- Elaboration of: Economy Class/ Caste System Architecture Kin Systems Religion Ecological Economies Hunter-Gatherers - relative lack of ecological manipilation - Lived in fragile (vs robust) ecosystems, fewer types of life forms, more vulnerable - Fishing - Hunting - Gathering
- Gender division of labor All Native Populations Agriculturalists Planting Crops Population increases, but they are still labor-poor Right to work land passes through women The Elaboration of Agricultural Societies Kinship: Clans, Matriliny. Polygyny Religion: Dedicated Sites, Elaborated Ceremonies Class and Social Hierarchy: Priests, Warriors, Political Leaders Agriculturalists from Southern New England through Central America Southernmost cultures relied most heav Class Structure Lords: (most important, warriors, judges) Promotion by Merit. Responsible for regions within the empire Chieftains Warriors Charles II and the restoration of the monarchy Prince William of Orange (Protestant, Calvinist) and Mary II or England Seal of England thrown into the Thames because he thinks it will stop all legistature 1688- Bloodless Revolution- Offer thrown with one exception, they must sign English Bill of rights The Battle of the Boyne Presentation of the Bill of Rights John Locke, reps of the people most important Constitutional Convention, the reps of the people become the people and since the people are the orgin of the government, there is no law above a constitutional convention, whatever it decides, will be enacted England does not have a written constitution, good because things that did not exist back then laws can be changed or made to fit era, can change as people change
Britsh and Neo-British Law Ultimate goal is to protect property John Locke- The Power to tax is the power to destroy And inalienable rights include “life, liberty, and property.” British Constitutions - Colonies founded pre- 1688: Parliament is not part of the governmental picture. - Colonies founded post-1688: Parliament WAS part of the picture - Timing of settlement affects constitutional relationships Metropolitan British vs. Provincial British: Identities as Britons Each colony had a house of representatives elected by voters -They replaced Parliament in individual colonies

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