Collected our data from our population which consists

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collected our data from our population which consists of Canadian high school students and our sample size consisted of 60 randomly chosen students from our schools Section 3: Analysis Independent Variable: Annual Family Income
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Mean $77,000 Median $70,000 Mode $50,000 Our main/independent variable is annual household income. To make our survey and data more organized, we created intervals that go up by $20,000 ($20,000 - $40,000, $40,000 - $60,000, etc.). After collecting all our data, we calculated the central tendencies for this graph and came to a conclusion that the average student within our sample has a mean of $77,000 household income, the median is $70,000, and the most of our sample have a household income of $50,000. 11% of our surveyors (7 out of 60) have a low household income between $20,000 - $40,000. 27% of the surveyors (16 out of 60) have a household income between $40,000 - $60,000. This was also the highest total percent of our sample. 22% of surveyors (13 out of 60) have a household income within the range $60,000 - $80,000. 15% of surveyors (9 out of 60) have an annual household income between $80,000 - $100,000. 8% of our surveyors (5 out of 60) have an annual household income within $100,000 - $120,000. 10% of surveyors (6 out of 60) have an annual household income between $120,000 - $140,000. Lastly, our lowest total percent of our sample is 7% (4 out of 60) who have an annual household income of $140,000 or more. This shows us that our data may be somewhat in accurate since we did not sample an equal number of students per interval due to a lack of time. Dependant Variable(s): - Socio-Economic Status vs. How Often Families Go On Vacation
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Family vacations can play a factor in determining whether or not a family spends a lot of time together. Our results concluded that how often a family goes on vacation does not relate to income or how strong a family's bond is. In order to make this variable measurable, we chose a number to correspond with how often families eat together (1 = Never, 2 = Rarely, etc.). Through our research we have determined that families with household incomes within intervals $20,000 - $40,000 and $40,000 - $60,000 averaged a rank of 2, which means they rarely go on vacation. While household incomes within intervals $60,000 - $80,000 and $80,000 - $100,000 averaged a rank of 4, which means they often go on family vacation. Incomes within range $100,000 - $120,000 averaged a rank of 3, which means they sometimes go on family vacations. Families with household incomes within interval $120,000 - $140,000 averaged a rank of 4, which mean they often go on vacation. Lastly, income higher than $140,000 averaged a range of 2, which means the families rarely go on family vacations together. The line of best fit shows that there's a weak positive correlation between income and family vacation. This is because the value of r is 0.28 which is very far from 1. - Socio-Economic Status vs. How Often Families Eat Together By asking how often a family eats together, it also explores if they talk about their day and feelings with one another, which in turn adds to how close a family is. Through our research we have determined that families with a high socioeconomic status (income of $80,000+) eat less together than families with a lower socioeconomic status ($20,000 - $80,000). For example
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  • Fall '18
  • Household income in the United States, FAMILY RELATIONS

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