This turning point in nominations and confirmations

Info icon This preview shows pages 46–49. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This turning point in nominations and confirmations resulted from the ratification of the 17 th amendment, ratified in 1913, and the 1929 Senate rules change, which opened hearings to the public. This change did not happen immediately, though. In addition, no justices were nominated between 1925 and 1930, allowing the 1930 split to be both relevant and convenient. By splitting the population at this point, 75 members were in the pre-1930 group and 40 members in the post-1930 group. For sampling purposes, 30 justices were chosen from before 1930 and 20 were chosen after 1930. Because more justices were appointed in the pre-1930 group, the sample included more justices from 20 This study examined only the successful nominations of eventual Supreme Court justices. There have been twenty-seven failed Supreme Court nominations (Maltese 3). Although researching the history of nominations from well-known nominees to unknown nominees, this research is specifically about nominations as a prerequisite to confirmation and excludes failed and trial-balloon nominations.
Image of page 46

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
45 that group as well. To ensure an even distribution within the pre-1930 group, 15 justices were chosen before 1861 and 15 justices were chosen between 1862 and 1929. These breaks in the Court membership resulted in three groups: the pre-1861 group, the 1862-1929 group, and the post-1930 group. In each group, justices were numbered, starting with one (1). Once numbered, a random number generator was used to pick the sample from the population. The random number generator function on a TI- 83 graphing calculator was used to pick the sample. The calculator was programmed to choose a number between 1 and 34 for the pre-1861 group, between 1 and 39 for the 1862-1929 group, and between 1 and 37 for the post-1930 group. This function was repeated until enough justices from each group were chosen (15, 15, and 20 respectively). If the calculator chose the same number more than one, the justice to whom that number corresponded was counted only once. This process continued until the required numbers of unique justices were chosen. This process resulted in a sample of 50 justices spanning from James Wilson (1789) to David Souter (1990). Biographies Due to time constraints, it was not possible to research fully the backgrounds of each of the 50 justices in the sample. Instead, in an effort to learn more about the individual justices, short biographical sketches from The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States were read. Some biographies were not much more than a few paragraphs, while others continued for several pages. Because this study focused on the public awareness of the justice during his nomination and confirmation, the biographies were read for information about the justice prior to taking the oath of office.
Image of page 47
46 Biography Coding A code sheet was prepared for the biographies.
Image of page 48

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 49
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern