This suggests that the tenant is trying to introduce

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the yard. This suggests that the tenant is trying to introduce a red herring, which makes this argument contextually irrelevant. See pp. 65–71. Passage 9 1. c) It’s impossible to tell. A premise is acceptable if the arguer does not have to bear the burden of proof, or, if the arguer does, then they do so successfully. In this case, we can’t tell if the tenant would accept this or not. It depends on how familiar the tenant is with the rental agreement, so we have to fall back on the standards of the universal audience. But these don’t give us a clear answer, either, so this premise is not acceptable. See pp. 52–56. 2. c) It’s impossible to tell. A premise is acceptable if the arguer does not have to bear the burden of proof, or, if the arguer does, then they do so successfully. In this case, we can’t tell if the tenant would accept this or not. It depends on how familiar the tenant is with the rental
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Good Reasoning Matters! A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking , Fifth Edition © Oxford University Press Canada, 2012 agreement, so we have to fall back on the standards of the universal audience. But these don’t give us a clear answer, either, so this premise is not acceptable. See pp. 52–56. 3. c) It’s impossible to tell. A premise is acceptable if the arguer does not have to bear the burden of proof, or, if the arguer does, then they do so successfully. In this case, we can’t tell if the tenant would accept this or not. It depends on how familiar the tenant is with the rental agreement, so we have to fall back on the standards of the universal audience. But these don’t give us a clear answer, either, so this premise is not acceptable. See pp. 52–56. 4. a) Yes. In order to be deductively valid, it must be impossible for the conclusion to be false and the premises true. For this argument, if the premises are true, the conclusion must be. If the rental agreement includes maintenance, and maintenance includes the yard, then it follows that the tenant must clean the yard. There is no other possibility. Therefore, this is a deductively valid argument. See pp. 60–61. 5. a) Yes. An argument is contextually relevant if it fits within the context established by previous conservation or dialectic. This argument responds directly to the points raised by the tenant in the second argument and reintroduces the point originally raised by the landlord in the first argument. Therefore, it is very contextually relevant. See pp. 65–71.
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