asked Nora to convince Helmer to let Krogstad keep his job Nora becomes more

Asked nora to convince helmer to let krogstad keep

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asked Nora to convince Helmer to let Krogstad keep his job, Nora becomes more manipulative because she knows if Krogstad doesn’t keep his job her live would fall apart. Emotions such as hate and vengeance and even passion mold the way Nora changes in the play. Krogstad causes Nora to rip off this metaphorical mask that she’s been wearing in front of Torvald because he is not in the room with them. Krogstad causes a feeling of uneasiness and panic when he enters a room. Not just for Nora, but for Mrs. Linde as well. As the readers continue on into the play, it is revealed that Mrs. Linde once had an intimate relationship with Krogstad. When Krogstad comesto visit Nora to blackmailing her into reassuring him he’ll keep his job or her secret of forgery and borrowing money comes out shows what vengeance he has in his soul to do such a thing. Deep within that darkness in Krogstad there is also passion and a sense of caring because Krogstad doesn’t want this job for his benefit, but for the benefits of his sons: "For their sake I must win back as much respect as I can in the town" (Ibsen) He was also caught for a crime
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Hanley 4similar to Nora’s and he just wants to redeem himself for the sake of his children’s reputation. According to Torvald who refuses to let Krogstad keep his job, Krogstad’s sins are like a spreading virus and "Every breath the children take in is filled with the germs of something degenerate" (Ibsen). Nora begins to contemplate suicide because she is so worried how Torvald would act if he reads the letter. The fact that it can go so far as talk of suicide shows just how controlling Torvald is. Nora is afraid of her husband because he won’t see her as the wife he wants her to be but he’ll see her as a liar instead. When Torvald finally reads the letter, he turns into this monster that Nora has never seen before. Torvald calls Nora “a miserable creature” (Ibsen) simply because she he thinks his reputation will be compromised and people would talk and look down at him. Torvald doesn’t even care about Nora, he just cares about how society will see him. When Torvald said, “Now you have destroyed all my happiness. You have ruined all my future. It is horrible to think of! I am in the power of an unscrupulous man; he can do what he likes with me, ask anything he likes of me, give me any orders he pleases--I dare not refuse. And I must sink to such miserable depths because of a thoughtless woman!” (Ibsen) It
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