Hoover the nation s editors write to hoover asking if

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article “Is It to Be Murder, Mr. Hoover?” The Nation ’s Editors write to Hoover asking if the “murder by starvation, murder by disease, murder by killing all hope-and the soul?” was the plan of action that Hoover had in mind for helping mend the nation ( The Nation 235). The authors are calling the president to action after congress passed an act to give 300,000,000 dollars to the states, mocking the longevity of this bill. Hoover had been hesitant to aid his people because he feared the nation would become accustomed to handouts and quit working. In a mere two-year span, 1930 to 1932, unemployment raised from four million to 2
Woodward thirteen million. Hoover’s time in office was destroyed by his efforts, or lack there of, during the depression. Before the Great Depression, women began modernizing and leaving their corseted bodice in the 19 th century and becoming more equal peers. During the First World War, four states passed equal pay laws, while 13 allowed for women to serve on juries. The era was not as empowering as it may seem. Marriages were struggling, and women were forced to deal with most of the repercussions. Women had to marry by their early twenties to find a husband from the unequal gender gap the war caused. Husbands had the tendency to be unfaithful abroad, but wives were supposed to remain faithful and understand that “sex is biological for men, but emotional for women.” In Paula S. Fass’ essay “Sex and Youth in the Jazz Age,” she takes an in-depth look at the stigmas and formalities that came about in this era. She discusses how cosmetics and dieting started to become popular as women began to

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