Based on the humanistic philosophies person centered therapists assert that

Based on the humanistic philosophies person centered

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 11 pages.

Based on the humanistic philosophies, person-centered therapists assert that people are fundamentally good and capable of change (Corey, 2013). According to Anderson (2001), “All individuals have within themselves the ability to guide their own lives” (p. 340). Rogers’s nondirective approach focused on the client being fully served, while acknowledging that the client possessed the ability to change in a healthy environment (Corey, 2013; & Hagenow, 2003). Self-actualization or the “actualizing tendency” which is the ability to grow, develop, and mature has been a key factor in the person-centered approach. Followers of the humanistic theories argued that all people are motivated toward self- understanding (Corey, 2013; & Kirschenbaum, 2012). Therapeutic Process The six conditions Rogers’s presented for a successful therapeutic process were: (1) psychological contact between mental health professional and client, (2) the client experiencing distress, (3) the mental health professional in congruence with the client, (4) the mental health professional experiences unconditional positive regard, (5) mental health professional communicates and experiences empathetic understanding, and (6) the professional’s communication and client’s perception of empathetic understanding and unconditional positive regard are minimally achieved (Quinn, 2015). Elliott and Freire (2007) noted in Rogers’s hypothesis: “No other conditions are necessary. If these six conditions exist, and continue over a period of time, this is sufficient” (p. 286). Rogers’s initial philosophy for the therapeutic process stated that no techniques were needed as long as the therapist complied with the six listed conditions (Elliott & Freire, 2007). Core Conditions
Image of page 4
5 The core conditions of person-centered therapy have been researched to support Rogers’s hypothesis that they were necessary and sufficient for client change (Elliott & Freire, 2007). Rogers’s described the facilitating conditions as: “congruence, empathy, unconditional positive regard” (as cited in Elliott & Freire, 2007). Research on conditions, process, outcomes, and motivations has been done, suggesting that a therapist must possess these conditions in order to engage in a successful process (Cornelius- White, 2008). Rogers’s purpose for creating the core conditions had been for the client to: “reconnect with their actual, individual experiences and valuing processes” (Cooper & McLeod, 2010, p. 214). During Rogers’s time working as an academic in Wisconsin, he researched psychotherapy among schizophrenics. The goal had been to discover the trends between the facilitating conditions of change and the client process (Quinn, 2015). The team measured the therapist’s empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard from the point of view of the therapist, outside observers, and the client.
Image of page 5
Image of page 6

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 11 pages?

  • Spring '14
  • DoctorThomasFonseca

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture