Election The Nashville Junto nominated Andrew Jackson for president in 1824 of

Election the nashville junto nominated andrew jackson

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Election The Nashville Junto nominated Andrew Jackson for president in 1824. of 1828 With the help of Van Buren, Jackson used the new democracy to his advantage. Jackson ran as a Democrat Republican, against Adams’s National Republicans. The campaign turned brutal, with each side defiling the other’s name. Calhoun was Jackson’s running mate, while the vice president of Adams. This was done as a remnant of elite politics, where wealth and connections would transcend party loyalty. The election, with Jackson winning 56% popular vote was the first national party election. The Nashville and Richmond Juntos, and Concord and Albany Regencies worked together to nationally elect Jackson as president. Jackson’s Jackson’s election was seen as a victory for the common man. Jackson Presidency was the first to respond to the changing country and this led to his appeal, even though he was a slave owner and a wealthy military leader. Jackson was born in 1767 in North Carolina to a poor family. He moved to Nashville in 1788 and became a stable planter. He got into many duels and was a good defender against Indians. The battle of new Orleans made him a national hero, and became a symbol of the pioneer. He entered politics with no experience. He was elected president in 1829, right after the death of his wife. His swearing in was as rowdy as his campaign, with people coming and going through the windows of the white house. This is to be the new face of politics. Strong Politics was stripped of the dignified and polite distinction it had up till Executive now. Jackson was very controversial, ignored his official cabinet, and made his own “kitchen cabinet” full of his friends and representatives of actions he supported. This did not include his vice president. Jackson used social distance to separate himself form other politicians. When Jackson’s secretary of war, John Henry Eaton married an elite woman, Jackson urged support for Mrs. Eaton, even though the marriage violated the party values. This upset the other cabinet member’s wives and caused a split between Jackson and Calhoun. Jackson used 12 vetoes, compared with 9 total from the first six presidents. Jackson’s negative activism restricted federal activity, in sharp contrast to the previous administrations. Jackson forced congress to constantly consider his opinions. Nation’s he was more interested in promoting strong national leadership than Leader vs. promoting sectional balance. He believed that the president ought to Sectional dominate the government, because that was the will of the people. He Spokesmen faced three strong sectional figures; John Calhoun (South Carolina, strong southerner/ pro slavery, “cast iron man”), Senator Daniel Webster
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(Massachusetts, a great orator and lawyer, supporter of commercial interests), Henry Clay (Kentucky, speaker of the house 1811-1825, charming and witty, proponent of American system and transportation. He could have merged an alliance between north and west, but Jackson didn’t want it.). Sectional interests remained strong, even
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