in injured extremity c Traction weights 5 to 10 pounds d 2 Skeletal a Provides

In injured extremity c traction weights 5 to 10

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in injured extremity c.Traction weights 5 to 10 pounds d.2.Skeletala.Provides a long-term pull that keeps injured bones and joints aligned b.Physician inserts pin or wire into bone (either partially or completely)i.Align and immobilize injured body part.c.Skeletal traction weight range: 5 to 45 pounds (depending on where traction is applied)v.Nursing Management1.Do not interrupt weights applied2.Skin should be inspected AT LEAST every 8 hours for inflammation andirritationa.Can get traction associated pressure ulcers3.Monitor color, motion, and sensation of the afected extremity4.Monitor the insertion sites for redness, swelling, or drainage5.Provide insertion site care as prescribedf.Castingi.Immobilize bone and joints after a fracture or injury but also allow movementii.Many materials are used1.Plaster = cheap, easily moldable (but takes 24+ hours to dry)2.Other materials are lighter and dry faster (more expensive)a.Natural, synthetic, acrylic, fiberglass-free, latex-free polymer, or a hybrid of materials3.Provider preference and what’s available determines what type of material used iii.Need to watch for allergic reactions (especially with synthetic materials)iv.Nursing Management1.Keep cast and extremity elevated to prevent edema2.Handle a wet cast with the palms of the hand until dry instead of finger tipsa.Finger tips can make imprints on cast3.Examine the skin and cast for pressure areasa.Look for drainage4.Monitor the extremity for circulatory impairment and signs of infectiona.Neurovascular assessment = importantb.If extremities swell, can impair circulationi.Ciculatory impairment1.Bivalve cast – cut into to relieve pressure5.Tell patients to avoid putting things into cast
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6.Some casts can get wet while others can’ta.Teach patients what to do if they do get them wet (Ex. cool blow dryer)18.Fracture Nursing Diagnosesa.Risk for fallsb.Risk for skin integrityc.Impaired mobilityd.Paine.Risk for infectionf.Altered Nutritiong.Psychosocial19.Nursing Management (Fractures)– Others1.Not as likely calcium will crystalize with this much fluid2.If calcium crystalizes, plenty of urine to flush itc.Rapid deconditioning of cardiopulmonary systemi.Result of prolonged bed restii.Results in1.Orthostatic hypotension2.Decreased lung capacitya.Coughingb.Deep breathingc.Incentive spirometry20.Fracture complications (risk factors, assessment, treatment, nursing care)a.Majority heal without complicationsb.If death occurs, usually result of i.Damage to underlying organs and vascular structuresii.Complications of fracture or immobilityc.Infectioni.Treatment is costly in terms of1.Extended nursing and medical care2.Time for treatment3.Loss of patient incomeii.Osteomyelitis may become chronicd.Compartment Syndromei.
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  • Fall '08
  • Staff
  • acute pain, Orthopedic surgery, Bone fracture

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