Control and decision making are transferred from the

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Successful Project Management
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 39
Successful Project Management
Clements/Gido
Expert Verified
Control and decision making are transferred from the project manager to the project team. Cohesion begins to develop. There is a sense of team. Individuals feel accepted as part of the team, and they accept others as part of the team. There is an appreciation of each member’s contribution to accomplishing the project objective. Trust begins to develop in this stage, as team members start to confide in one another. There is a greater sharing of information, ideas, and feelings; cooperation increases. Team members give and ask for feedback and feel that they can freely and constructively express their emotions and criticisms. A feeling of camaraderie
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Successful Project Management
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 39
Successful Project Management
Clements/Gido
Expert Verified
emerges as the team goes through a socialization process. Personal friendships may develop that reach beyond the work environment. During the norming stage, the project manager minimizes directiveness and takes on a more supportive role. Work performance accelerates, and productivity increases. The project manager should recognize the project team for the progress being made. 11-2d Performing The fourth stage of team development and growth is the performing stage. In this stage, the team is highly committed and eager to accomplish the project objective. The level of work performance is high. The team feels a sense of unity and pride in its accomplishments. Confidence is high. Communication is open, frank, and timely. During this stage, members work individually or in temporary subteams, as needed. There is a great degree of interdependency—members frequently collaborate and willingly help each other with work beyond their own assigned tasks. The team feels fully empowered. As problems are identified, appropriate team members form subteams to solve the problems and decide how the solution should be implemented. There is a feeling of satisfaction as progress is made and recognized. Individual members realize that they are experiencing professional growth as a result of working on the project. During the performing stage, the project manager fully delegates responsibility and authority, thereby empowering the project team. She or he focuses on helping the team execute the project plan and on giving recognition to team members for their progress and accomplishments. At this stage, the project manager concentrates on project performance with respect to the scope, budget, and schedule. The project manager’s role is to facilitate and support the development and implementation of corrective actions if actual progress falls behind planned progress. It is also at this stage that the project manager acts as a mentor, supporting the professional growth and development of the people working on the project. Figure 11.2 graphically illustrates the levels of work performance and sense of team during the four stages of team development and growth. The amount of time and effort it takes a team to move through each of the stages depends on several factors, including the number of people on the team, whether team members have

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